AHQ INSIDER Beaufort (SC) Spring 2018 Fishing Report – Updated May 24 Reviewed by Momizat on . -- The newest Beaufort fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-beaufort-sc-summer-2018-fishing-report/ May 24 Inshore wat -- The newest Beaufort fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-beaufort-sc-summer-2018-fishing-report/ May 24 Inshore wat Rating: 0
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AHQ INSIDER Beaufort (SC) Spring 2018 Fishing Report – Updated May 24

The newest Beaufort fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-beaufort-sc-summer-2018-fishing-report/

May 24

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are around 80 degrees.

Water temperatures are heating up in the Beaufort area, and Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that they are catching redfish but at times the fish have been selective to eat a fly.  Particularly on low tide they have been a little finicky, but there has also been the added complication that at times they are throwing at black drum, which are much less likely to eat flies than bait.  Not since the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew has Tuck seen so many black drum on the flats. There are also tons of tiny white shrimp, which may explain the selective feeding.

On tailing tides it has been easier to get fish to eat on the fly, and a Dupre Spoon Fly that comes through the grass weedlessly has been working well.  Tailing fish can be targeted in short grass as well as in pockets in the tall grass.

On spinning tackle reds are eating mud minnows well, and cut mullet is also working.  Generally that bite has been better on moving tides in the middle of the incoming or outgoing, with the peak or bottom of the tide cycle worst. Grass edges, shell points, and cuts where water is going into or coming out of the grass have been good, particularly in areas where birds are around.  Working the edges of grass flats with Gulp or DOA shrimp has also been working. Overall fish have been a little spookier on lower tides.

A nice red caught this week on Tuck's boat

A nice red caught this week on Tuck’s boat

 

And safely released

And safely released

The inshore cobia season looked to be starting off positively, but then for a while the fish were almost nonexistent in the Broad River. It has come back a slight bit, but overall it is nowhere near where it should be and the season has been fairly disappointing at best.

There have been some tripletail spotted along inshore weedlines, and further into the season they should show up on the flats, too.

April 27

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are cooler than expected in late April, between 65 and 67 degrees, but expected to climb quickly. Clarity is moderate, and worse when it’s windy.

The fishing continues to progress nicely in the Beaufort area, and Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that overall the big schools of redfish have split up into smaller groups. Today on the water they saw a good number of tailing fish in the grass.  When you can fish for tailing fish the best bet on spinning tackle is a Gulp! peeler crab, and on the fly a crab pattern in size 2 or 4 is a good option.

On mid-tides then fishing around shell bars and the outside of small creek mouths is a good pattern. On the dropping tide fish shell points until the water is out of the grass.  Bait will work, as will shallow suspended twitch baits.  On low tide the best option is to get into skinny water on the mud flats and fish the twitch bait.

A nice redfish caught on Tuck Scott's boat

A nice redfish caught on Tuck Scott’s boat

Tuck continues to hear of a few big trout being caught in deeper creeks, and slow trolling with grubs on a ¼ ounce jighead is probably the best way to target them.  Fishermen are reminded that, as a precautionary measure, the SCDNR is asking anglers to practice catch and release of all spotted seatrout through the end of September.  To read the full news release click here.

Any day now some early cobia are expected to show up.

April 12

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are up to 63 degrees, cool for this time of year. Visibility is good enough to sight fish as long as there is no wind to muddy the water.

So far April has been a better fishing month than March, and Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that overall the redfish are pretty happy.  On low tide they are still fairly schooled up often in groups of 100 or so, and sight-fishing is pretty good when conditions allow it.  Gulp! on ¼ or 1/8 ounce jigheads, and on the fly toad or shrimp/ crab patterns, are both working.

On higher water the fish are doing a couple of things, with some fish heading to the edge of tailing flats and surveying them – and some already getting up on the flats and tailing! These fish are generally singles, and the tailing action will certainly get better as temperatures warm.

Other groups of fish are splitting off into groups of 20 or so fish on higher tides and starting to take up residence around shell bars and other traditional ambush points where they do not have to work as hard to feed.

There have been some isolated reports of big trout caught back in deeper creeks, possibly where they survived the cold this winter.  Fishermen are reminded that, as a precautionary measure, the SCDNR is asking anglers to practice catch and release of all spotted seatrout through the end of September.  To read the full news release click here.

Be sure to check out the Lowcountry Fly Fishing Expo presented by Bay Street Outfitters on Saturday, April 21.

A nice early spring redfish caught on Tuck Scott's boat

A nice early spring redfish caught on Captain Tuck Scott’s boat

March 30

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are up to 58 degrees, and clarity is starting to go down.

It’s been a fairly typical March in Beaufort, and unfortunately that’s not a good thing.  Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that it’s been very windy almost all the time, and fish have been pretty fussy with the occasional good day.

Overall redfish are still pretty schooled up, but starting to spread out a little.  On higher stages of the tide you can see them starting to split off into singles and laying in the grass, and it won’t be too terribly long before they are tailing on some of the high tides.  It’s worth starting to look.

The best bite continues to be sight-fishing on low tide, and on the fly shrimp/ crab hybrid patterns have been working well.  There is some color to the water now and so root beer colored flies are working well, but it’s not dark enough for black yet.  On conventional tackle Mirrolure shallow suspended twitch baits, Gulp! baits and mud minnows are all working.

A March redfish caught with Captain Tuck Scott

A March redfish caught with Captain Tuck Scott

There have been no positive reports on troutrecently.  Anglers are reminded that, as a precautionary measure, the SCDNR is asking anglers to practice catch and release of all spotted seatrout through the end of September.  To read the full news release click here.

March 15

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area have dropped to about 55 degrees, and the water is very clear when it is not windy.

A couple of weeks ago it looked like things were headed in the other direction, but after a cold March Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that redfish are still very much in their big winter schools.  The low tide sight-fishing bite has been good when the weather (wind) cooperates, and on the fly shrimp patterns have been very productive.  Because fish have been in such shallow water that soft plastics on 1/8 ounce jigheads have been better than heavier baits.

While low tide is still the best time to fish, on high water they have been able to find some fish over white shells.

A nice Beaufort redfish caught on Tuck Scott's boat

A nice Beaufort redfish caught on Tuck Scott’s boat

Tuck has not heard of any trout caught recently.  Anglers are reminded that, as a precautionary measure, the SCDNR is asking anglers to practice catch and release of all spotted seatrout through the end of September.  To read the full news release click here.

March 2

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort remain around 60 degrees.  Water clarity is decreasing, indicating that algae is starting to bloom.

March Madness is fully in swing with the Beaufort-area redfish, by which Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) means that some days they will eat extremely well – and other days they seem to have lockjaw.  Overall the pattern is relatively unchanged from last week, but throughout this month expect more extreme highs and lows.

Making fishing even more challenging this week there has been a lot of wind, but they have still managed to get out and have some good days.  On all stages of the tide sight-fishing with hard plastic twitch baits, gold spoons, swimbaits and mud minnows is working when fish are feeding, and when you have to fish blind scented soft plastics like Gulp! or mud minnows are the best bet.

A nice Beaufort redfish caught off Captain Tuck Scott's boat

A nice Beaufort redfish caught off Captain Tuck Scott’s boat

Anglers are reminded that, as a precautionary measure, the SCDNR is asking anglers to practice catch and release of all spotted seatrout through the end of September.  To read the full news release click here.

February 23

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are around 60-61 degrees.  Water clarity is still pretty good.

The Beaufort redfish bite is definitely improving, but Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that there are still better and worse days.  Fish are still pretty schooled up and sight-fishing is the best way to catch them, with a variety of baits working.  Shallow suspended twitch baits, gold spoons, swimbaits, and mud minnows are all working on conventional tackle, and on the fly fairly simple patterns in natural colors are working best.

Outside of the low tide period, you may be able to find fish sunning along the grass lines on warm, afternoon higher tides although there will be less of that as the water warms.  When fish are deeper/ harder to spot then casting with Gulp! or paddletail-type grubs on a ¼ ounce jighead will work.

Caught this week with Captain Tuck Scott

Caught this week with Captain Tuck Scott

Tuck continues to hear of a few trout being caught.  Anglers are reminded that, as a precautionary measure, the SCDNR is asking anglers to practice catch and release of all spotted seatrout through the end of September.  To read the full news release click here.

February 16

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are around 56-57 degrees.  The water is clear but no longer gin clear because of all the rain in the area.

After a week away fishing for bonefish in the Bahamas, Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) is back chasing the Beaufort redfish.  Some days they are cooperative, like yesterday, but other days – like earlier in the week – getting bites is more challenging.  Generally when you can get several days of stable, warm weather the bite is good, but both sides of a cold front it is tougher.  This bodes very well for the next couple of weeks.

Overall fish remain very schooled up, and it’s mainly still a sight-fishing bite.  Fishing the dropping tide around oyster bars has been the best way to convince them to eat, and on dead low tide they can get lockjaw.  On higher stages of the tide it’s worth running the grass lines and looking for their coppery backs – a lot of times they will be found just sunning on the top of the water.

On the fly realistic looking flies and smaller shrimp patterns in light colors are working well, and on conventional tackle lighter-colored grubs have also been good.

A beautiful flats red caught yesterday on Tuck Scott's boat

A beautiful flats red caught this week on Captain Tuck Scott’s boat

Tuck has heard of a very few trout caught but nothing to speak of.  Anglers are reminded that, as a precautionary measure, the SCDNR is asking anglers to practice catch and release of all spotted seatrout through the end of September.  To read the full news release click here.

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