AHQ INSIDER Beaufort (SC) Winter 2017/18 Fishing Report – Updated February 1 Reviewed by Momizat on . -- The newest Beaufort fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-beaufort-sc-spring-2018-fishing-report/ February 1 Inshore -- The newest Beaufort fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-beaufort-sc-spring-2018-fishing-report/ February 1 Inshore Rating: 0
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AHQ INSIDER Beaufort (SC) Winter 2017/18 Fishing Report – Updated February 1

The newest Beaufort fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-beaufort-sc-spring-2018-fishing-report/

February 1

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are around 48 degrees, and the water remains very clear.

The pattern for redfish in the Beaufort area remains pretty similar, but Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that tidal and temperature variances can make a big difference.  Generally fish remain very schooled up on the flats, but during a cold front and even the day before they can be hard to find when the pressure is changing.  Additionally, during periods of extreme tides they stay nearer to deep water.  Fish are also on the move because of voracious dolphins.

Generally, sight-casting with bright or natural colored lures and flies is the best pattern.

A nice flats red caught on Captain Tuck Scott's boat

A nice flats red caught on Captain Tuck Scott’s boat

Before the extreme cold Tuck was seeing some trout on the flats, but not since then.  Anglers are reminded that, as a precautionary measure, the SCDNR is asking anglers to practice catch and release of all spotted seatrout through the end of September.  To read the full news release click here.

January 18

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are around 44 degrees, and the water is very clear.

Redfish in the Beaufort area are in a typical winter pattern, and Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that the best time to catch the tightly schooled fish is at low tide.  Sight casting is the name of the game, and ¼ or 1/8 ounce jigheads with your favorite grub body will catch fish.  Light colors such as white, tan, or even bright colors such as pink or chartreuse will work, but in the gin clear water you don’t need the extra silhouette of dark colors.

On high tide it may be possible to find some fish around oyster beds, and they generally don’t go too far from their low tide locations.  The upside is that they probably won’t be as spooky, but they are much harder to locate.

The Beaufort trout population was walloped by the cold weather, and Tuck is pretty sure that most of the trout are dead as it just stayed too cold for too long.  Beaufort has such a strong population of dolphins that the fish generally don’t float up to the surface – when they slow down the dolphin gorge on them.  This is a natural cycle and after a couple of mild winters the population should rebound, but in the meantime anglers should do everything they can to keep the remaining trout alive so they can breed.  As a precautionary measure, the SCDNR is asking anglers to practice catch and release of all spotted seatrout through the end of September.  To read the full news release click here.

December 19

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are around 50 degrees, and the water has gotten super clear.

The weather has turned around in the Beaufort area, and as a result Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that fishing conditions have been excellent.  Redfish are mostly grouped up in big schools on the flats, and at low tide sight-fishing has been excellent in the super clear water around oyster bars.  Fish have been very willing to take both flies and conventional artificial lures.

A nice low tide red caught this week on Captain Tuck Scott's boat

A nice low tide red caught this week on Captain Tuck Scott’s boat

Surprisingly, trout have also been up on the flats in very shallow water.  They have been eating small shrimp fly patterns extremely well.

The last sight many a shrimp has seen

The last sight many a shrimp has seen

December 15

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are around 54 degrees, and conditions are fairly clear.

Weather has been a limiting factor for Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) recently, but now that we seem to be getting out of a rainy spell the trout bite is starting to pick up again.  Throwing DOA Shrimp and grubs on ¼ ounce jigheads in 3-4 feet of water on moving tides has been working pretty well, with the outgoing tide best.

Redfish are starting to get more schooled up, and on lower stages of the tide you can find them by hunting around shallow oyster bars in the clear water.  On any of the moving tides you want to look around shell points when there is some water in the grass, and they will take mud minnows or live shrimp under a popping cork.  Fishing can be tougher on higher tides, but you can look for fishing that are cruising or floating.  They may also be around bigger points where grass is sticking out a bit further.

Another good option in the winter months is to prospect along banks with white shell.  These areas offer the double benefit of offering a good background to see fish as well as reflecting a lot of heat into the water that attracts reds.

December 1

Inshore water temperatures in the Beaufort area are around 59 degrees, and conditions are very clear.

With fish happy and hungry and the water clear, it is pretty much the peak time of the year to fish for redfish in the Beaufort area.  Captain Tuck Scott of Bay Street Outfitters (843-524-5250) reports that on the next cycle of tailing tides there may be one last group of tailing fish for the year, but on low tide they are doing some great sight-fishing on the fly for reds.

On the dropping tide fishing around shell bar points with artificial lures including DOA shrimp and grubs or scented soft plastics on a ¼ ounce jighead are working, and fish are pretty shallow.  When the water is up fish are generally spreading out in the grass and dispersing, and it is generally easier to target them around mounds, shell bars and points on lower tides.

A beautiful fall redfish caught on Captain Tuck Scott's boat

A beautiful fall redfish caught on Captain Tuck Scott’s boat

The trout bite continues to be pretty phenomenal, although fish are a bit deeper with cooling water.  Points in 3 feet of water have been good, but just working the banks a bit off the grass at that depth has also been productive on most any moving tide.  The outgoing has been a bit better than the incoming.  DOA shrimp under a popping cork, and popping it a lot, has been productive, as has been searching with live shrimp.  Once you find fish then you can switch back to artificials so you don’t run through a lot of expensive bait.

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