AHQ INSIDER Lake Monticello (SC) Spring 2018 Fishing Report – Updated May 24 Reviewed by Momizat on . -- The newest Lake Monticello fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-lake-monticello-sc-summer-2018-fishing-report/ May -- The newest Lake Monticello fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-lake-monticello-sc-summer-2018-fishing-report/ May Rating: 0
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AHQ INSIDER Lake Monticello (SC) Spring 2018 Fishing Report – Updated May 24

The newest Lake Monticello fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-lake-monticello-sc-summer-2018-fishing-report/

May 24

Lake Monticello water temperatures range from about 80-82 degrees, and lake levels generally fluctuate daily.

It’s starting to get into a summer pattern on Lake Monticello, but FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that the bass are not yet stacked up in deep water.  Early you can find a good topwater pattern fishing around points and former spawning pockets where there may be some fry guarders and late post-spawn fish, but during most of the day the best place to look is in transition areas in the 10-15 foot range off points or even in front of docks. Crankbaits, big worms and spoons are the best baits.

There are already a few fish on the deep holes that Andy likes to fish, but instead of catching two or three bass you are lucky to get one.  They should stack up deep soon.

On the catfish front,  Captain William Attaway(803-924-0857) reports that there is starting to be a pretty good free-line drifting bite on the lake, particularly with small pieces of cut herring.  There is also pretty good action for larger fish anchoring cut bait on humps and long points in 35 or less feet of water, and any time now he expects the free-line bite to take off.

May 10

Lake Monticello water temperatures are in the mid- to upper-70s, and lake levels generally fluctuate daily.

The spawn is pretty much concluded on Lake Monticello, and FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that as a result a lot of the fish have started to head out deeper.  There is still a pretty good topwater bite early, and fishing a buzzbait or a Spook around points, steeper banks with some wood cover, or rare rocky points may get you bit.

Once the sun gets up you need to fish deeper, and in this transition phase between spring and summer patterns at lot of fish will be in the 15-foot range off points. Crankbaits, big worms and spoons are the best baits.

Around the end of May they will head into the 20-40 foot zone where they will spend much of the summer, and they will continue to be aggressive.  When they first really school up it can be the best bite of the year.  Around the second week of July they usually get more finicky and you need to throw finesse baits like drop shots.

Andy Wicker with the kind of Lake Monticello bass they will be catching out deep soon

Andy Wicker with a big Monticello bass

On the catfish front,  Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that as predicted the bite has picked up on Monticello.  The best action has come fishing cut bait on humps and long points in 35 or less feet of water, and any time now he expects the free-line bite to take off.

April 27

Lake Monticello water temperatures are in the mid- to upper-60s, and lake levels generally fluctuate daily.

On the catfish front,  Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that the bite has been a little slow. He has found the best action anchoring cut bait in 25-45 feet of water on the bottom, where they have been catching a mixed bag of sizes.  The bite should pick up around the time water temperatures rise a few more degrees.

April 12

Lake Monticello water temperatures are in the mid- to upper-60s, and lake levels generally fluctuate daily.

There’s a reason that in the last report FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria said that this is most people’s favorite time of year to fish for bass on Lake Monticello.  In the inaugural Thursday night tournament of the season Andy and his brother Dan McGlohorn weighed in an impressive 22-6 bag last week.  They fished spawning pockets with a worm, and even thought Andy knew it was a good way to get a bunch of bites he was surprised by the quality they found. Usually they get a good fish or two that way, but they caught multiple four- and five-pounders.

Everything came on a weightless Senko and a Texas rig, and they were casting at every piece of shallow structure they could find be it a dock, tree, stump, etc.  While they weren’t sight-fishing most of the fish seemed to be just getting on the beds or very close to spawning as they had big, fat bellies.

Andy and Dan show off some big ones

Andy and Dan show off some big ones from last spring – Thursday night’s fish did not get photographed

March 30

Lake Monticello water temperatures vary from the upper-50s to mid-60s with the influence of the warm-water discharge.  Lake levels generally fluctuate daily.

It’s most people’s favorite time to bassfish on Lake Monticello, and FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that right now you want to be fishing in less than five feet of water and have a bunch of different worms tied on – a floating worm, a Texas rig, a weightless Senko and a shakey head. There are a large number of males already on beds, and there are also some good females up shallow near the bank. More and more good females will continue to pull up.  This is the very best time of the year to beat the bank on Lake Monticello.

Dan McGlohorn shows off a nice pre-spawn Monticello fish caught this week

Dan McGlohorn shows off a nice pre-spawn Monticello fish caught this week

No new catfish report.

March 15

Lake Monticello water temperatures vary wildly from the mid-50s to mid-60s between the influence of the warmwater discharge and variable air temperatures.  Lake levels generally fluctuate daily.

It’s getting to be pretty good bass fishing on Lake Monticello, and FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that last weekend it took about 20 pounds to win an event with 30 or 40 boats.  One wave of fish spawned back in late February when temperatures spiked, but the next wave of pre-spawn bass are staging off points at the entrance to bays and coves where they will ultimately spawn.  The best fishing is in 12 feet of water and less.

Shallow to medium-running crankbaits have been the best baits so far, but soft plastics will also work well right now.  Very soon you should be able to fish a floating worm back in the spawning pockets.

No new catfish report.

February 23

On the catfish front,  Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that fish are heading shallower and as long as temperatures continue to increase they will keep going in that direction.  The best pattern right now is anchoring on humps that top out in about 30 feet of water; on long, gently sloping points; and in the back of deep coves.  Perch, bream, and gizzard shad are the best baits.

No new bass fishing report from FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria, out on Tour.

February 9

Overall, FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that bass fishing on Lake Monticello is still tough as nails.  Fishing deep with Alabama rigs and shakey heads around rock in 15-25 feet is the best bet, but nothing is hot.

On the catfish front,  Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports anchoring on deep water humps with cut bait is still the best way to catch fish.  Both white perch and gizzard shad are working well.

January 18

Despite some rotten weather,  Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that the catfish bite remains good on Lake Monticello.  Anchoring on deep water humps with cut bait is the best way to catch fish right now, and both white perch and gizzard shad are working well.

A big Monticello blue caught recently with Captain William Attaway

A big Monticello blue caught recently with Captain William Attaway

No new bass fishing report from FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria.

December 21

It’s the time of year when the Lake Monticello bass should be stacking up on points and drops in 30-35 feet of water and eating a jigging spoon, but unfortunately FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria says they just are not.  He reports that a bass bite has been very hard to come by, and even the perch have been inconsistent. It’s unclear exactly what is going on.

Luckily, the catfish action on Monticello remains good according to Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857).  While drifting will catch fish, he still suggests anchoring in the 50-70 foot range.

A nice blue caught recently with Captain William Attaway

A nice blue caught recently with Captain William Attaway

December 14  

In catfish news, Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that the best place to look is still around humps and long points in 50-70 feet of water.  Drifting has gotten a little bit better, but he still recommends anchoring.  There are some occasional tough days but overall the bite has been good.

A nice Monticello blue cat caught on Captain William Attaway's boat

A nice Monticello blue cat caught recently on Captain William Attaway’s boat

Bass reports are slim on Lake Monticello, but FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria says that if he were out there right now he would definitely be fishing a jigging spoon and drop shot.  Points and drops in 30-35 feet are the best places to start, but it’s all about where you are marking the bait.

December 1

If the results from the day after Thanksgiving bass tournament on Lake Monticello are any indication that lake is still fishing pretty tough, and it only took 12 pounds for the win.  Tournament angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria says that right now is the time for fishing a spoon on Lake Monticello, chiefly in the 30-40 foot range.  Of course, the exact depth depends on where you are marking bait.  Points and drops hold the most fish this time of year.

Around now the birds become a useful tool for finding fish on Monticello, although if you see them over very deep water in the 100-foot range they are probably over catfish and perch.  However, any activity closer to the bank is a good sign that bass are nearby.

On the catfish front, Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that the drift bite really hasn’t picked up yet and so he recommends anchoring.  At times it has been a little slow, but there are still some good fish being caught in 50-70 feet on humps and long points with cut bait.  Patience and being at the right place at the right time is the key.

November 10

Lake Monticello water temperatures have dropped into the mid-60s.  Lake levels generally fluctuate daily.

In catfish news, Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that the fall bite is picking up on Lake Monticello – and should only continue to get better as the season progresses.  Already the Monticello beasts are beginning to move around, and for the next month or two the best trophy fishing of the year should take place.

The best pattern right now seems to be anchoring on humps in 55-75 feet and fishing cut gizzard shad, white perch and bream.  The drifting bite hasn’t really taken off yet.

A 52-pound blue caught recently with Captain William Attaway

A 52-pound blue caught recently with Captain William Attaway

October 20

Lake Monticello water temperatures have dropped into the mid to lower-70s, while clarity is still very good.  Lake levels generally fluctuate daily.

After a late-summer slowdown bass fishing on Lake Monticello is getting better, and tournament angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that fish are starting to move shallower.  That’s Monticello-shallow, not Lake Wateree shallow, and so some good fish are being caught in 7-10 feet of water on Carolina rigs.  There has also been a pretty decent topwater bite early in the morning.

Plenty of fish remain deep, too, and using a jigging spoon you can catch bass as well as scads of perch off the right points.

August 31

Lake Monticello water temperatures have dropped several degrees from their highs in the 90s. Lake levels generally fluctuate daily.

Tournament angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that towards the end of the summer lake Monticello bass fishing got tough, and whereas 20 pound sacks were winning night tournaments earlier in the season weights well under 10 pounds were good enough by the end.  Most of the fish are still offshore, but the bite has really slowed.

Although September can still be a tough month, Andy expects the deep fish to bite better.  He will be dragging a worm around deep spots including brush and drop-offs in 30-40 feet, and when water temperatures cool a few degrees there should also be a decent topwater bite early.  Some fish are already being caught on a Pop-R first thing but the window should get longer.

As the fall progresses fish will be relating more to bait, and by late September or early October anglers will want to idle around and locate bait schools.  By mid-October Andy will be fishing vertically with a spoon.

Andy Wicker and Gary McGlohorn show off a couple of nice late August Monticello tournament fish

Andy Wicker and Gary McGlohorn show off a couple of nice late August Monticello tournament fish

On another front, the free-lining catfish bite continues to be really good.  Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that in addition to numbers of fish they are still catching some really nice ones free-lining pieces of cut herring.  The depth varies from day to day but the best results have come recently over 100-plus feet of water, with the baits generally running 5-15 feet down.  The hottest action has been close to the discharge where William speculates that the fish are eating cut bait that gets churned back up.  Look for the big fish bite to come on once temperatures cool off.

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