AHQ INSIDER Edisto Island (SC) Fall 2019 Fishing Report – Updated August 29 Reviewed by Momizat on . -- The newest Edisto Island fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/edisto-island-sc-fall-2019-fishing-report/ August 29 Inshore surf -- The newest Edisto Island fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/edisto-island-sc-fall-2019-fishing-report/ August 29 Inshore surf Rating: 0
You Are Here: Home » States » South Carolina » SC Coastal » Edisto Island » Edisto Island Inshore » AHQ INSIDER Edisto Island (SC) Fall 2019 Fishing Report – Updated August 29

AHQ INSIDER Edisto Island (SC) Fall 2019 Fishing Report – Updated August 29

The newest Edisto Island fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/edisto-island-sc-fall-2019-fishing-report/

August 29

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are still about 85 degrees, and clarity remains good in both the North and South Edisto River. There are plenty of shrimp and finger mullet around.

The numbers of trout being caught inshore around Edisto are still excellent, although Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that size is hit-or-miss with a lot of 12 – 13½ inch fish being caught.  Those number should improve once the migratory trout that come each fall arrive. The pattern is still similar, with a good topwater bite first thing around main river points.   After that shrimp fished 3-5 feet under a popping cork will work throughout the day in the same areas.  Trout will feed anytime there is clean, green water, but that usually means a couple of hours before and after high tide.

A good catch this week with Captain Ron Davis

A good catch this week with Captain Ron Davis

The redfish are in a familiar pattern, but right now there are tons of 11-13 inch fish on the flats and in the creeks.  At the new and full moon bigger ones are tailing well, but finding schools of slot-sized fish can be challenging.  On the river flats all you need is live shrimp fished shallow under a popping cork around structure.

Fish can also be caught back in the creeks around low tide in the usual deep bends with fallen trees and structure, docks, etc.  Small finger mullet on a Carolina rig are the bait of choice as shrimp will get too many bites from bait stealers.

The flounder bite remains much better than usual, with about half the fish over 15 inches.  The best way to target them is with finger mullet on a Carolina rig around main river points.

Sheepshead fishing is still fair, but sizes are just starting to improve.  As we get into September more and more big fish will feed.  Fishing with fiddler crabs around docks with 10-15 feet of water at low tide is the best pattern.

Tarpon fishing is wide open, and in the lost two days Ron’s boat has hooked four. The best place to fish for them is at the bars leaving the rivers and they are rolling everywhere right now. Live or cut mullet or menhaden are the best baits.

Nearshore there are lots of Spanish mackerel from just beyond the breakers out to 60 feet, but the best range is 30-40 feet.

July 29

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 85 degrees, and clarity remains good in both the North and South Edisto River.   Bait shrimp remain hard to catch since we are between white and brown shrimp seasons, but finger mullet are easy to catch in the creeks.

The trout fishing is still really good inshore around Edisto, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the keeper percentage continues to climb. There is still a good topwater bite first thing around main river points, and live shrimp or mud minnows fished 4-6 feet under a popping cork will work throughout the day in the same areas. Trout will feed anytime there is clean, green water, but that usually means fishing around high tide.  Fish will continue to spawn through September.

The redfish are still in a familiar pattern, and on the outgoing tide the fishing has been pretty good fishing finger mullet 1 ½ to 2 feet below a popping cork on the river flats. The better fishing is early, and like trout you can pick up some reds on topwater lures.

Fish can also be caught back in the creeks around low tide in the usual deep bends with fallen trees and structure, docks, etc.  There are so many bait stealers in the creeks that you can’t fish shrimp, but cut mullet and cut crab will both work – with live finger mullet on a Carolina rig pretty much the bait of choice.

Captain Ron Davis, Jr. with a nice Edisto Island redfish

Captain Ron Davis, Jr. with a nice Edisto Island redfish

The flounder bite is still much better than usual, and the best way to target them is around main river points with mud minnows or mullet on a Carolina rig.

Sheepshead fishing is still fair, and most of the fish are small.  They remain deeper, and fishing with fiddler crabs around docks with 10-15 feet of water at low tide is the best pattern.

From now until September is the peak season for tarpon, and at the mouths of inlets and the mouths of major creeks in the main river they are seeing lots of fish.  There are tons of big schools of mullet and menhaden around.

There are a ton of whiting and sharks in the surf.

Nearshore there are lots of Spanish mackerel from a couple of miles offshore out to 60 feet, and it continues to be the best king mackerel season in a long time from 60 feet out to the ledge.  Spadefish are holding at the Edisto 60 and further out, but fishing is not particularly strong.

In 90-120 feet bottom fishing is wide open, with a mix of snapperporgies, triggerfish, black sea bass and more.

Dolphin and billfish are still around, but the wahoo bite remains the best thing going offshore.

July 24

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about as hot as they will get, between 86 and 88 degrees.  Clarity remains good in both the North and South Edisto River.   Bait shrimp are a little hard to catch as we are between white and brown shrimp seasons, but finger mullet are easy to catch in the creeks.

If anything the trout fishing has gotten better inshore around Edisto, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that they are catching more big fish than a month ago. The keeper percentage has gotten higher. There is still a good topwater bite first thing around main river points, and live shrimp or mud minnows fished 4-6 feet under a popping cork will work throughout the day in the same areas. Trout will feed anytime there is clean, green water, but that usually means fishing around high tide.  Fish will continue to spawn through September.

The redfish are still in a familiar pattern, and on the outgoing tide the fishing has been pretty good fishing finger mullet 1 ½ to 2 feet below a popping cork on the river flats. The better fishing is early, and like trout you can pick up some reds on topwater lures.

Fish can also be caught back in the creeks around low tide in the usual deep bends with fallen trees and structure, docks, etc.  There are so many bait stealers in the creeks that you can’t fish shrimp, but cut mullet and cut crab will both work – with live finger mullet on a Carolina rig pretty much the bait of choice.

The flounder bite is still much better than usual, and the best way to target them is around main river points with mud minnows or mullet on a Carolina rig.

An inshore slam with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.

An inshore slam with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.

Sheepshead fishing is still fair, and most of the fish are small.  They remain deeper, and fishing with fiddler crabs around docks with 10-15 feet of water at low tide is the best pattern.

From now until September is the peak season for tarpon, and at the mouths of inlets and the mouths of major creeks in the main river they are seeing lots of fish.  There are tons of big schools of mullet and menhaden around.

There are a ton of whiting and sharks in the surf.

Nearshore there are lots of Spanish mackerel from a couple of miles offshore out to 60 feet, and it continues to be the best king mackerel season in a long time from 60 feet out to the ledge.

In 90-120 feet bottom fishing is wide open, with a mix of snapperporgies, triggerfish, black sea bass and more.

In the Governor’s Cup this weekend there were some dolphin caught as well as a ton of wahoo to go along with just under 10 blue marlin and 40-50 sailfish.

June 26

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 84 degrees in the mornings.  Clarity remains good in the North Edisto, while the South Edisto remains dirty.  Bait shrimp is still easy to find.

Trout fishing remains the best thing going inshore around Edisto, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that there is still a good topwater bite first thing around main river points.  Live shrimp fished 4-6 feet under a popping cork will work throughout the day in the same areas.  Trout will feed anytime there is clean, green water, but that usually means fishing around high tide.

There are not many trout back in the creeks.

The redfish are still in a familiar pattern, and on the outgoing tide the fishing has been pretty good fishing live shrimp 1 ½ to 2 feet below a popping cork on the river flats. The better fishing is early, and like trout you can pick up some reds on topwater lures.

Fish can also be caught back in the creeks around low tide in the usual deep bends with fallen trees and structure, docks, etc.  There are so many bait stealers in the creeks that you can’t fish shrimp, but cut mullet and cut crab will both work – with live finger mullet on a Carolina rig pretty much the bait of choice.

Often a by-catch in the Edisto area, they are catching more flounder than usual while fishing for other species, including on artificial lures.  The best action remains around main river points, and if you fish mud minnows or mullet on a Carolina rig (instead of under a floating cork) you can really improve the chances of catching a mess of flatfish.

Sheepshead fishing is still basically fair, mostly because the catch is mainly small fish at this point.  Because of the heat they have gone a little deeper, and fishing with fiddler crabs around docks with 10-15 feet of water at low tide is the best pattern.

Tarpon are still rolling everywhere, and they are seeing tons of them at the mouths of major creeks on the outgoing tide.  However, because these fish are over deep water this can be a very difficult place to present a bait to them, and so concentrating on sand bars early with mullet or menhaden is still the best pattern.

Nearshore Spanish mackerel fishing is still excellent in 30-60 feet of water, and king mackerel are strong from the same range out to the ledge.  But the best nearshore fishery is for spadefish, which are better than usual even compared to what is usually an excellent time of year to fish for them. Jellyballs are prolific and they are eating them well.   There are also some cobia in the same areas as the spadefish.

The dolphin is the only species to really drop off this week, and they have gotten much more scattered.

A couple of big spadefish caught earlier this month with Captain Ron Davis

June 21

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 82 degrees in the mornings.  Clarity is good in the North Edisto, while the South Edisto is dirty.  Bait shrimp have gotten easy to find.

Trout fishing remains the best thing going inshore around Edisto, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that there is still a good topwater bite first thing around main river points.  Live shrimp fished 4-6 feet under a popping cork will work throughout the day in the same areas.  Trout will feed anytime there is clean, green water, but that usually means fishing around high tide.

There are not many trout back in the creeks.

The redfish are in a familiar pattern, and on the outgoing tide the fishing has been pretty good fishing live shrimp 1 ½ to 2 feet below a popping cork on the river flats. The better fishing is early, and like trout you can pick up some reds on topwater lures.

Fish can also be caught back in the creeks around low tide in the usual deep bends with fallen trees and structure, docks, etc.  There are so many bait stealers in the creeks that you can’t fish shrimp, but cut mullet and cut crab will both work – with live finger mullet on a Carolina rig pretty much the bait of choice.

Often a by-catch in the Edisto area, flounder fishing has been really good this year and even without targeting them specifically Ron’s boat has been picking up a good number while fishing for other species.  They caught a 19-incher on a Vudu Shrimp this week! The best action has been around main river points, and if you fish mud minnows or mullet on a Carolina rig (instead of under a floating cork) you can really improve the chances of catching a mess of flatfish.

Sheepshead fishing is basically fair, mostly because the catch is mainly small fish at this point. Because of the heat they have gone a little deeper, and fishing with fiddler crabs around docks with 10-15 feet of water at low tide is the best pattern.

Tarpon are rolling everywhere, and they are seeing tons of them at the mouths of major creeks on the outgoing tide.  However, because these fish are over deep water this can be a very difficult place to present a bait to them, and so concentrating on sand bars early with mullet or menhaden is probably the best pattern.

Nearshore Spanish mackerel fishing is excellent in 30-60 feet of water, and king mackerel are strong from the same range out to the ledge.  But the best nearshore fishery is for spadefish, which are better than usual even compared to what is usually an excellent time of year to fish for them. Jellyballs are prolific and they are eating them well.   There are also some cobia in the same areas as the spadefish.

While the dolphin bite is not what it was at the beginning of the summer, there are still plenty around including some bulls!

A bull dolphin caught this week with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.

A bull dolphin caught this week with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.

Leave a Comment

© 2019 scfishingreport.com |

Scroll to top