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AHQ INSIDER Charleston (SC) Fall 2019 Fishing Report – Updated August 30

  • by Jay

The newest Charleston fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-charleston-sc-fall-2019-fishing-report/

August 30

Inshore water temperatures in Charleston are around 84 degrees.  Shrimp are easy to net at low tide and finger mullet are abundant.

The time of year has finally arrived where it is ridiculously easy to catch redfish if you are willing to wade through the small ones, and Captain Rob Bennett (843-367-3777) reports that on a recent trip they caught 60 fish ranging in size from 12-25 inches.  They can be found in a variety of areas, but the mouths of gutter creeks that have oyster beds are a good place to look on moving tides.  Any live bait under a popping cork will work.

A healthy creek red caught this week with Captain Rob
A healthy creek red caught this week with Captain Rob

Troutcan be found in similar areas, and on the incoming or outgoing tide around shell bars they can be caught under popping corks on live shrimp.  Shell bars that are near sand are the best, and the trout should get bigger as the month progresses.

There are lots of ladyfish around, which Rob points out make excellent sharkbait.

Tarponare also around in the best numbers of the year right now.  They can be caught on live or cut mullet and menhaden around the sand bars.

As the water cools mullet will be starting to run the beaches, and very soon bull red drum and black drum will be in the surf.  Both species will eat shrimp and cut mullet will catch reds.

Folly Beach Pier (843-762-9516) reports that fishing activity has been a little down with school back in session, but with the big pier tournament this Saturday they expect plenty of whiting, drum, trout and pompano to be caught.

July 31

Inshore water temperatures in Charleston are in the mid-80s.  Finger mullet are abundant in the creeks while shrimp are just approaching bait size.

With slightly cooler temperatures the fishing for several resident species has picked up this week, but Captain Rob Bennett (843-367-3777) reports that the most exciting bite has been for jack crevalle.  At times they are schooling in the Charleston Harbor or at the mouth of inlets, and when that is going on you can throw big surface lures at them.  When they are not on the surface then slow trolling live mullet or menhaden will work.

A big jack caught this week with Captain Rob Bennett
A big jack caught this week with Captain Rob Bennett

There is still a good trout bite early in Charleston, and Rob reports that his boat is still catching them fishing mud minnows under a popping cork along the grass lines. Fish will certainly eat live shrimp as well, but fishing with mud minnows they are getting less bait stealers. High tide has been the best time to target the fish.

The flounderfishing remains really strong, and they can be caught with mud minnows fished on the bottom along the high tide grass lines as well as around structure in areas with a mix of mud, shell and sand.  The mouths of gutter creeks on either the incoming or outgoing tide also remain good places to target.

There are a lot of redfisharound but they are generally 8-11 inch fish, while the bigger boys have been harder to come by.  However, on good high tides poling on the grass flats and looking for tails has been a successful pattern.

Tarponare prolific off the beaches and sandbars in 3-6 feet of water, and fish can be caught on live mullet or menhaden fished on both the top and the bottom.  There are still a lot of sharks around.

The surf also has a lot of pompano, which can be caught on sand fleas or small pieces of shrimp. Whiting are also prolific.

Folly Beach Pier (843-762-9516) reports that black drum, sheepshead, trout and whitingare begin caught in the mornings and evenings.

July 19

Inshore water temperatures in Charleston are still around 87 degrees.  Shrimp and finger mullet are abundant in the creeks.

There is still a good trout bite in Charleston, but Captain Rob Bennett (843-367-3777) reports that his boat has been catching them fishing mud minnows under a popping cork along the grass lines.  Fish will certainly eat live shrimp as well, but fishing with mud minnows they are getting less bait stealers.  High tide has been the best time to target the fish.

There have also been some redfishmixed in with the trout, but generally they have been small. Bigger fish are in deeper water.

The flounderfishing remains really strong, and they can be caught with mud minnows fished on the bottom along the high tide grass lines as well as around structure in areas with a mix of mud, shell and sand.  The mouths of gutter creeks on either the incoming or outgoing tide also remain good places to target.

Tarponare prolific off the beaches and sandbars, and fish can be caught on live mullet or menhaden.  There are still a lot of bonnethead sharks around.

Folly Beach Pier (843-762-9516) reports that it’s pretty much an early bite right now, and in the shallow surf they have had trout, sheepshead and whiting caught before it gets too hot.  While Spanish mackerel and kings have not been around, they had a 24-pound jack crevalle caught this week off the diamond at the end of the pier.

The 24-pound jack caught earlier this week off Folly Beach Pier
The 24-pound jack caught earlier this week off Folly Beach Pier

June 27

Inshore water temperatures in Charleston are still around 83 degrees.  There are plenty of small shrimp and finger mullet in the creeks.

The best fishing is still early in the day, and Captain Rob Bennett (843-367-3777) reports that first thing you can catch trouton mud minnows or live shrimp fished around oyster beds, and right at daybreak you can catch them on topwater lures.  Rob is catching plenty of big roe trout and he advises letting them go.

The flounderfishing has also been strong, and fishing around structure and areas with a mix of mud, shell and sand has been productive.  The mouths of gutter creeks on either the incoming or outgoing tide have also been good places to target.  Right now Rob recommends tossing a mud minnow on a split shot rig or fishing near the bottom under a cork.

It’s still an in-between time for inshore redfish, and most of the fish are small.  The bigger fish are in deep holes like Dynamite Hole or the Grillage, or out at the reefs.  Dock fishing is a little slow.

Tarponare off the beaches and sandbars, and the bite will only continue to improve.  They can be caught on live mullet or menhaden.

There are also a lot of bonnethead sharks around.

Folly Beach Pier(843-762-9516) reportsthat a big 5-pound 2-ounce Spanish mackerel won their tournament on Saturday, and there are still lots of whiting, pompano, bluefish and black drum being caught along with some sheepshead.

At the artificial reefs the spadefishfishing remains very good, with any reefs 6-10 miles offshore including 4KI, the Edisto 40, and Capers Reef still covered up.  Spanish mackerelshould continue to school offshore all summer long, and you can troll for king mackerel as well. There are also amberjacksaround.

This big Spanish won the Folly Beach Pier tournament Saturday
This big Spanish won the Folly Beach Pier tournament Saturday

June 20

Inshore water temperatures in Charleston are still around 83 degrees.

It’s that time of year when the best fishing is often early in the day, and Captain Rob Bennett (843-367-3777) points out that this is particularly the case with the threat of afternoon pop-up thunderstorms.

Early in the morning you can catch trouton mud minnows or live shrimp fished around oyster beds, and right at daybreak you can catch them on topwater lures.  Rob is catching plenty of big roe trout and he advises letting them go.  Flounderhave also been showing up in good numbers, and along with the trout they can be caught around oysters.

It’s still an in-between time for inshore redfish, and most of the fish are small.  The bigger fish are in deep holes like Dynamite Hole or the Grillage, or out at the reefs.  Dock fishing is a little slow.

But Rob's boat is still catching some reds around docks...
But Rob’s boat is still catching some reds around docks…

As expected tarponhave arrived off the beaches and sandbars, and they can be caught on live mullet or menhaden.

Folly Beach Pier (843-762-9516) reportsthat fishing has been really good recently, and they have seen large Spanish mackerel over 3 pounds, 2-4 pound black drum, 2+ pound trout, as well as plenty of bluefish, whiting and pompano.  They also a had a rare 2 pound flounder caught yesterday.  King mackerel still have not arrived.

At the artificial reefs the spadefishfishing remains very good, with any reefs 6-10 miles offshore including 4KI, the Edisto 40, and Capers Reef still covered up.  Spanish mackerelare also schooling offshore, and you can troll for king mackerel as well.  There are also amberjacks around.

June 3

Inshore water temperatures in Charleston are around 83 degrees.

The weather has been hot in the Charleston area, and Captain Rob Bennett (843-367-3777) reports that inshore fishing depends on the time of day.  Early in the morning you can catch trouton minnows, live shrimp or artificials under a popping cork, but the bite dies after a few hours.  Right at daybreak you can catch them on topwater lures.

Trout like this can be caught before the sun gets too high
Trout like this can be caught before the sun gets too high

It’s an in-between time for inshore redfish, and most of the fish are small.  The bigger fish are in deep holes like Dynamite Hole or the Grillage, or out at the reefs.  Dock fishing is a little slow.

Sheepshead fishing is good around rocks, docks and jetties, as long as you have at least four feet of water.  Fiddler crabs are the best bait.

Any day now tarponshould show up off the beaches and sandbars since the water has gotten so warm.  Manatees have already arrived.

Folly Beach Pier (843-762-9516) reportsthat they have been catching some nice Spanish mackerel, black drum, sheepshead and pompano up to 2 pounds off the pier.

At the artificial reefs jelly balls are thicker than Rob has ever seen them, and as a result the spadefishfishing is awesome.  Any reefs 6-10 miles offshore including 4KI, the Edisto 40, and Capers Reef have been covered up.  Spanish mackerelare also schooling offshore, and you can troll for king mackerel as well.

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