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AHQ INSIDER Edisto Island (SC) 2022 Week 18 Fishing Report – Updated May 6

  • by Jay

May 6

Morning surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are up to about 73 degrees inshore. The North Edisto is still clear while the South is a bit tannic. 

The trout fishing is getting better and better around Edisto each day, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that, while you can still catch a few fish in the creeks, most of the bigger groups of fish are in the main rivers. They are starting to spawn and you can find them around white shell banks, points and current rips. 5-8 feet of water is the target depth. 

In the morning there is a good topwater bite for the first two hours, while all day you can catch them on live bait (mud minnows and shrimp if you can get them) or DOA shrimp and grubs under a cork. 

On the flats the redfish action has picked up just a little, but they are still not feeding very well. But most of all it is hard to find schools of fish. 

The bite is much better in the creeks where all you really need to catch them is frozen shrimp. They are hanging around the deep bends, and low tide is the best time to target them.

The flounder action has really picked up, and particularly early in the season most of the fish are close to the ocean. They are on sand flats and at the mouths of creeks. You can catch them on mud minnows, but most of the fish over 16 inches that are being harvested right now are being gigged.  

There are piles of small black drum in the creeks around trees, but not very many of them are keepers. However, it’s a really good time for large sheepshead. They can be found around structure in 6-10 feet of water. Fishing fiddler crabs on low tide is the best way to get them. 

There are mostly small whiting in the surf, but if you go just beyond the sand bars to about 8-10 feet of water better ones are around in good numbers. Bigger ones can also be found at the mouth of inlets. 

On days you can get out there is a lot of good action at the nearshore reefs, headlined by cobia and spadefish. There are not many jelly balls around but the spadefish will eat shrimp, while cobia will take live bait including pinfish or bucktails with long, curly-tail trailers. Spanish mackerel and blues are also thick, and there are lots of bull reds around the reefs. 

There are still some weakfish but that is tailing off. 

The better bottom fishing for everything including keeper black sea bass, triggerfish, porgies, vermillion snapper, and grouper is in 70-90 feet of water. 

There have only been about four good offshore days so far since the run began, but the dolphin bite has been pretty phenomenal those days.  There are also blackfin tuna and some spotty wahoo action. The dolphin are beyond the ledge in 600-1200 feet, while the best wahoo and tuna action is at the ledge in 150-200 feet. 

April 21

Morning surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are up to about 68 degrees inshore and the water is still clear. 

There’s some significant improvement with the inshore fishing around Edisto this week, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the trout have transitioned out to the main rivers to spawn and they can be caught around the white shell points. The fish are busting with eggs. While early in the morning topwater lures are hard to beat, after that DOA shrimp will work well if you can’t get live shrimp. 

On the flats the redfish action is still slow in large part due to seasonal factors, but in the creeks if you can find the fish they will eat most any cut bait including crab, mullet and shrimp. They are hanging around the deep bends and low tide is the best time to target them. 

Caught by a young angler with Captain Ron Davis this week
Caught by a young angler with Captain Ron Davis this week

The sheepshead and black drum fishing is still good, and both species are mixed together around pilings in 6-10 feet. There are also a lot of small black drum which can be found around trees. Fiddler crabs will work for both species while black drum will typically eat a broader array of crustaceans. 

There are only small whiting in the surf, but if you go just beyond the sand bars to about 8-10 feet of water better ones are around in good numbers. Bigger ones can also be found at the mouth of inlets.   

Bad weather has limited trips to the nearshore reefs, but when you can get out there the big weakfish have really showed up this year. There are also lots of bluefish and Spanish mackerel around, as well as a few bull redfish. Everything is biting 1-2 ounce jigging spoons right now.  

When you can get out the bottom fishing has been on fire recently, with keeper black sea bass, triggerfish, porgies, vermillion snapper, illegal red snapper and more all in 70-90 feet of water. 

On the rare days when you can get offshore the wahoo action is really good!

April 8

Morning surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are up to about 65 degrees inshore and the water is still clear. 

The inshore fishing around Edisto is pretty crummy, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the trout fishing is still really tough as fish are in a transition period where they are trying to make the move from the creeks to the main rivers. You can’t catch many fish anywhere right now, and about the best bet is to troll grubs for scattered fish in the creeks. The only good news is that very soon it will pick up. 

On the flats the redfish action is extremely slow because it’s that time of year, but in the creeks if you can find the fish they will eat most any cut bait including crab, mullet and shrimp. They are hanging around the deep bends and low tide is the best time to target them. 

The best thing going inshore is still the sheepshead and black drum fishing, but it’s not as good as some years. Both species are mixed together around pilings in 6-10 feet and there are also a lot of small black drum which can be found around trees. Fiddler crabs will work for both species while black drum will typically eat a broader array of crustaceans. 

There are only small whiting in the surf, but if you go just beyond the sand bars to about 8-10 feet of water better ones are around in good numbers. Bigger ones can also be found at the mouth of inlets.   

Bad weather has limited trips to the nearshore reefs, but when you can get out there the big weakfish have really showed up this year. There are also lots of bluefish and Spanish mackerel around, as well as a few bull redfish. Everything is biting 1-2 ounce jigging spoons right now.  

When you can get out the bottom fishing has been on fire recently, with keeper black sea bass, triggerfish, porgies, vermillion snapper, illegal red snapper and more all in 70-90 feet of water. 

On the rare days when you can get offshore the wahoo action is really good!

A great day for wahoo recently out of Edisto Island
A great day for wahoo recently out of Edisto Island

March 31

Morning surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 62-63 degrees inshore and the water is still clear. With one of the driest springs in recent memory they are hopeful for rain. 

This week there’s little doubt that – when you can get there – the best fishing around Edisto is out at the nearshore reefs, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports the big weakfish have really showed up this year. 6-pounders like the fish pictured below are a not-infrequent sight. There are also lots of bluefish and Spanish mackerel around, as well as a few bull redfish. Everything is biting 1-2 ounce jigging spoons right now.  

A giant weakfish caught this week
A giant weakfish caught this week

Inshore the trout fishing has gotten really tough as fish are in a transition period where they are trying to make the move from the creeks to the main rivers. You can’t catch many fish anywhere right now, and about the best bet is to troll artificials for scattered fish in the creeks. 

On the flats the redfish action is extremely slow because it’s that time of year, but in the creeks if you can find the fish they will eat most any cut bait including crab, mullet and shrimp. They are hanging around the deep bends and low tide is the best time to target them. 

The best thing going inshore is still the sheepshead and black drum fishing, but it’s not as good as some years. There are a lot of small black drum right now which can be found in the creeks and are most likely to be around trees, but there are also some black drum mixed in with the sheepshead around pilings. The target depth is still 6-10 feet. Fiddler crabs will work for both species while black drum will typically eat a broader array of crustaceans. 

There are only small whiting in the surf, but if you go just beyond the sand bars to about 8-10 feet of water better ones are around in good numbers. Bigger ones can also be found at the mouth of inlets.   

When you can get out the bottom fishing has been on fire recently, with keeper black sea bass, triggerfish, porgies, vermillion snapper, illegal red snapper and more all in 70-90 feet of water. 

Offshore report to follow next week. 

March 2

Morning surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 58 degrees and the water is still clear. 

There’s little doubt that the best thing going around Edisto is the sheepshead and black drum fishing, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that right now big ones can be caught both inshore and offshore. In 6-10 feet of water they are catching them around docks, and you can see them picking at the pilings in the clear conditions. Meanwhile the nearshore reefs are also loaded up with both species. 

Fiddler crabs are the best bait for both species, while black drum will also eat fresh cut shrimp. Fiddler crabs are available at Haddrell’s Point in Charleston but on sunny days you can also catch your own now. 

It’s a little early for the inshore bite to have come on, and usually it isn’t until the first full moon in March which is still a couple of weeks away.

The inshore trout fishing remains at best fair. The next month or so will be a transition period when fish are very scattered, and it won’t be until fish move from their current spots in the creeks to the main rivers that the fishing will pick up. For now covering lots of water in the creeks with grubs remains the best approach, as fish will be in some creek bends and not others.

Trolling is a very popular way to locate trout, and if you catch one or two then you should slow down and fish the area thoroughly. You can also go along the bank and cast. 

A variety of soft plastics on a 1/8 or 1/4 ounce jighead will catch fish, and of course, once you locate fish you can also cast live bait to them.

Tide doesn’t matter as long as the water is clear.

March is traditionally a tough time for redfish and this year appears to be no exception.   On Ron’s last charter they never saw any fish on the flats, and when you do spot them they are hard to get to eat. Reds should be hanging within ten feet of the banks while trout can be out in the middle deeper, and they never had a bite casting at some really good water until baits got out towards the middle where the trout were.  

The flats pretty much have extremely small bait like tiny crabs and small glass minnows and huge bait that is too big to eat like horse mullet, and so the fish are not especially primed to feed on normal offerings.

In the creeks the fishing is better but still not easy, and generally the best approach is to fish mud minnows two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, and rocks in deep bends and holes.   They will also eat cut bait.  

Until temperatures warm there is no high tide pattern anywhere. 

There are only small whiting in the surf, but if you go just beyond the sand bars to about 8-10 feet of water better ones are around in good numbers. 

The fishing is just starting to pick up at the nearshore reefs in 30-60 feet of water, and bluefish and weakfish are now showing up even though they are not thick yet. They will take jigs and jigging spoons, as will big redfish on the bottom. You can also use cut menhaden and catch bull red drum. As noted sheepshead and black drum are also out there as well as small black sea bass. 

It has been so windy that getting offshore has been tough. 

When you can get out the bottom fishing has also been good recently, with keeper black sea bass, triggerfish, porgies, vermillion snapper and illegal red snapper all in 60-90 feet of water. The best fishing is in 90 feet. 

There’s not much in the bluewater zone except the occasional monster wahoo, and a 120-pound fish was caught recently!

A monster wahoo caught recently
A monster wahoo caught recently

February 18

Morning surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 52 degrees and the water is still clear. 

If anything the redfish have gotten more lethargic and unwilling to eat this week on the flats, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that we are in the time of year when spotting them is easier than getting them to bite. We are also getting to the time where they are especially spooky, which makes for a tough combination. 

You can sight-fish for reds on either the lower incoming or the lower outgoing tide, but it has gotten even more important to be stealthy and go after them quietly with a trolling motor or by poling. The best way to catch them is to cast Gulp! or Zman soft plastics on light flutter hooks past the school and then bring it back towards them to avoid scaring the fish.   

In the creeks the pattern is still unchanged, and when you can find the fish they are more willing to eat. You should fish two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, and rocks in deep bends and holes. Mud minnows are the best bait.    

The best trout fishing remains in the creeks, but that bite continues to be slow in the cold water. Now a good day is catching 10 or so trout. They will be in some creek bends and not others, without a clear pattern, so the best approach is to cover water with grubs. 

Trolling is a very popular way to locate trout, and if you catch one or two then you should slow down and fish the area thoroughly. You can also go along the bank and cast. 

A variety of soft plastics on a 1/8 or 1/4 ounce jighead will catch fish, and of course, once you locate fish you can also cast live bait to them.

Tide doesn’t matter as long as the water is clear. 

While Ron has not seen any black drum mixed in with the reds on the flats, small ones are in the same deep holes in the creeks, especially around trees. Fishing with fresh cut shrimp you will catch both species.

There may be one or two keeper sheepshead inshore that can be caught at low tide around structure with 10-15 feet of water on fiddler crabs, oysters and clams. However, almost all of the better fish have gone offshore. 

There are not many whiting in the surf, but if you go just beyond the sand bars to about 10 feet of water they are around in good numbers. 

There’s good news off the beaches, and at the nearshore reefs in 30-60 feet of water the fishing is strong for sheepshead and black drum with a variety of crustacean baits. There are also plenty of bull drum for the catching in 40-60 feet of water. 

The bottom fishing has also been good recently, with black sea bass in 50-60 feet of water while in 80-90 feet there are triggerfish, porgies, vermillion snapper and illegal red snapper. 

The wahoo fishing is good in the bluewater zone.

February 10

Morning surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 51 degrees and the water is still clear. 

The best trout fishing remains in the creeks, but Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the bite continues to slow down in the cold water. Now a good day is catching 10 or so trout. They will be in some creek bends and not others, without a clear pattern, so the best approach is to cover water with grubs. 

Trolling is a very popular way to locate trout, and if you catch one or two then you should slow down and fish the area thoroughly. You can also go along the bank and cast. 

A variety of soft plastics on a 1/8 or 1/4 ounce jighead will catch fish, and of course, once you locate fish you can also cast live bait to them.

Tide doesn’t matter as long as the water is clear. 

The redfish are still pretty finicky on the flats. You can sight-fish for them on either the lower incoming or the lower outgoing tide, but it has gotten even more important to be stealthy and go after them quietly with a trolling motor or by poling. The best way to catch them is to cast Gulp! or Zman soft plastics on light flutter hooks past the school and then bring it back towards them to avoid scaring them. 

In the creeks the pattern is still unchanged, and when you can find the fish they are willing to eat. You should fish two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, and rocks in deep bends and holes. Mud minnows are the best bait.   

While Ron has not seen any black drum mixed in with the reds on the flats, small ones are in the same deep holes in the creeks, especially around trees. Fishing with fresh cut shrimp you will catch both species.

There may be one or two keeper sheepshead inshore that can be caught at low tide around structure with 10-15 feet of water on fiddler crabs, oysters and clams. However, almost all of the better fish have gone offshore. 

There are not many whiting in the surf, but if you go just beyond the sand bars to about 10 feet of water they are around in good numbers. 

There’s good news off the beaches, and at the nearshore reefs in 30-60 feet of water the fishing is strong for sheepshead and black drum with a variety of crustacean baits.  There are also plenty of bull drum for the catching in 40-60 feet of water. 

The bottom fishing has also been good recently, with black sea bass in 50-60 feet of water while in 80-90 feet there are triggerfish, porgies, vermillion snapper and illegal red snapper. 

The wahoo fishing is good in the bluewater zone.

February 1

Morning surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are stable at about 50 degrees and the water is still clear. 

The best trout fishing remains in the creeks, but Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reminds anglers that certain days the fish will be feeding – and on other days they will not. These cold-blooded animals don’t have to feed every day right now. They will also be in some creek bends and not others, without a clear pattern, so the best approach is to cover water with grubs. 

Trolling is a very popular way to locate trout, and if you catch one or two then you should slow down and fish the area thoroughly. You can also go along the bank and cast. 

A variety of soft plastics on a 1/8 or 1/4 ounce jighead will catch fish, and of course, once you locate fish you can also cast live bait to them.

Tide doesn’t matter as long as the water is clear. 

A nice trout caught with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.
A nice trout caught with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.

The redfish are still pretty finicky on the flats. You can sight-fish for them on either the lower incoming or the lower outgoing tide, but it has gotten even more important to be stealthy and go after them quietly with a trolling motor or poling. The best way to catch them is to cast Gulp! or Zman soft plastics on light flutter hooks past the school and then bring it back towards them to avoid scaring them. 

In the creeks the pattern is still unchanged, and when you can find the fish they are willing to eat. You should fish two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, and rocks in deep bends and holes. Mud minnows are the best bait.   

While Ron has not seen any black drum mixed in with the reds on the flats, they are in the same deep holes in the creeks, especially around trees. Fishing with fresh cut shrimp you will catch both species.

There are still a very few keeper sheepshead inshore that can be caught at low tide around structure with 10-15 feet of water on fiddler crabs, oysters and clams. However, most of the better fish have gone offshore. 

There are not many whiting in the surf, but if you go just beyond the sand bars to about 10 feet of water they are around in good numbers. 

It’s been too windy to get offshore much recently, but on the nearshore structure there should still be a few weakfish, and in 30-60 feet of water sheepshead and black drum can be picked up if you use shrimp or fiddler crabs. If you fish jigs and spoons and you will not catch them, but there are plenty of bull drum for the catching in 40-60 feet of water. 

When you can get out the best bottom fishing for black sea bass is in 50-60 feet of water, while in 80-90 feet there are triggerfish, porgies, vermillion snapper and illegal red snapper. 

Both tuna and wahoo are being caught offshore.

January 20

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 52 degrees and the water is clear.

The creek action for trout is still good, although Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that they aren’t catching a ton of big fish. While the fish will eat mud minnows on the bottom, you can’t cover much water to locate fish this way and so if you aren’t fishing grubs you really aren’t fishing! Trout are often in the creek bends but not always, and there is not necessarily a lot of rhyme or reason to where they are stacked up.

Trolling is a very popular way to locate trout, and if you catch one or two then you should slow down and fish the area thoroughly. However, Ron prefers to put the trolling motor down and cast like a bass fisherman.

A variety of soft plastics on a 1/8 or 1/4 ounce jighead will catch fish. 

The redfish are still very grouped up on the flats, and the best time to catch them has been the bottom of the outgoing to the first couple of hours of the incoming. In the clear conditions it is sight-fishing and if you find the fish you will catch them. Because the fish are spooky covering the flats with a trolling motor or poling is the best way to locate them, and you want to cast Gulp! or Zman soft plastics on a flutter hook past the school and then bring it back towards them to avoid scaring them. Mud minnows or cut mullet will also work. 

In the creeks the pattern is the same as it often is, and you should fish two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, and rocks in deep bends and holes. Fish are very grouped up and so when you find them they are usually pretty easy to catch. Mud minnows, cut mullet and Gulp! will all work. 

Right now a lot of sub-legal fish about 16 months old are being caught. 

While many of them are small, in the creeks there are tons of black drum in holes and around downed trees. They will take cut shrimp. 

Almost all of the better sheepshead have already left inshore waters for the nearshore reefs, but on low tide around structure with about 8-10 feet of water you can still pick up some little ones on fiddler crabs, oysters and clams. 

There are still a lot of whiting in the surf, with 6-10 feet the best depth to look for them.  

On the nearshore structure there are a ton of big weakfish in 30-40 feet of water, and the best way to catch them is with a jigging spoon or bucktail. There are also bull red drum,  abundant sheepshead and black drum out there. 

The bottom fishing is very good in 60-90 feet of water, but you can find keeper black sea bass starting as shallow as 50 feet. 

The bluewater zone catch is mainly wahoo right now. 

January 6

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 56 degrees and the water is clear.

The creek action for trout is good right now, although Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that they aren’t catching a ton of big fish. While the fish will eat mud minnows on the bottom, you can’t cover much water to locate fish this way and so if you aren’t fishing grubs you really aren’t fishing! Trout are often in the creek bends but not always, and there is not necessarily a lot of rhyme or reason to where they are stacked up.

Trolling is a very popular way to locate trout, and if you catch one or two then you should slow down and fish the area thoroughly. However, Ron prefers to put the trolling motor down and cast like a bass fisherman.

A variety of soft plastics on a 1/8 or 1/4 ounce jighead will catch fish. 

The redfish are very grouped up on the flats, and the best time to catch them has been the bottom of the outgoing to the first couple of hours of the incoming. In the clear conditions it is sight-fishing and if you find the fish you will catch them. Because the fish are spooky covering the flats with a trolling motor or poling is the best way to locate them, and you want to cast Gulp! or Zman soft plastics on a flutter hook past the school and then bring it back towards them to avoid scaring them. Mud minnows or cut mullet will also work. 

In the creeks the pattern is the same as it often is, and you should fish two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, and rocks in deep bends and holes. Fish are very grouped up and so when you find them they are usually pretty easy to catch. Mud minnows, cut mullet and Gulp! will all work. 

While many of them are small, in the creeks there are tons of black drum in holes and around downed trees. They will take cut shrimp. 

Most of the sheepshead have already left, but on low tide around structure with about 8-10 feet of water you can still pick up some on fiddler crabs, oysters and clams. However, most of the fish are already at the reefs.

There are still a lot of whiting in the surf, with 6-10 feet the best depth to look for them.  

On the nearshore structure there are a ton of big weakfish in 30-40 feet of water, and the best way to catch them is with a jigging spoon or bucktail. There are also bull red drum,  abundant sheepshead and black drum out there. 

The bottom fishing is very good in 60-90 feet of water, but you can find keeper black sea bass starting as shallow as 50 feet. 

The bluewater zone catch is mainly wahoo right now.

December 22

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are in the mid-50s and the water is clear.

We are still in the period where a water temperature drop can be a positive thing, and usually until water temperatures bottom out for the winter each drop in the mercury can make at least some inshore species feed better. It seems to remind fish that bait is on the verge of being totally gone, and they need to eat up now!

The main river bite for trout is in the rearview mirror, but Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the action in the creeks is still wide open – especially if you can find a calm day. While the fish will eat mud minnows on the bottom, you can’t cover much water to locate fish this way and so if you aren’t fishing grubs you really aren’t fishing! Trout are often in the creek bends but not always, and there is not necessarily a lot of rhyme or reason to where they are stacked up.

Trolling is a very popular way to locate trout, and if you catch one or two then you should slow down and fish the area thoroughly. However, Ron prefers to put the trolling motor down and cast like a bass fisherman.

A variety of soft plastics on a 1/8 or 1/4 ounce jighead will catch fish. 

The redfish are very grouped up on the flats, and the best time to catch them has been the bottom of the outgoing to the first couple of hours of the incoming. In the clear conditions it is sight-fishing and if you find the fish you will catch them. Because the fish are spooky covering the flats with a trolling motor or poling is the best way to locate them, and you want to cast Gulp! or Zman soft plastics on a flutter hook past the school and then bring it back towards them to avoid scaring them. 

In the creeks the pattern is the same as it often is, and you should fish two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, and rocks in deep bends and holes. Fish are very grouped up and so when you find them they are usually pretty easy to catch. Mud minnows, cut mullet and Gulp! will all work. 

While many of them are small, in the creeks there are tons of black drum in holes and around downed trees. They will take cut shrimp. 

Most of the sheepshead have already left, but on low tide around structure with about 8 feet of water you can still pick up some on fiddler crabs, oysters and clams. However, most of the fish are already at the reefs. 

There are still a lot of whiting in the surf.

On the nearshore structure there are a ton of big weakfish in 30-40 feet of water, and the best way to catch them is with a jigging spoon or bucktail. There are also bull red drum, sheepshead and black drum out there, and you can also find bull red drum feeding underneath the birds in 40-60 feet of water. 

The bottom fishing is very good in 60-90 feet of water. 

The wahoo fishing is really strong right now, and they are also picking up some tuna. 

December 16

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are around 56-57 degrees and the water is clear. 

While the main river bite for trout has pretty much dried up, Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the action in the creeks is wide open – especially if you can find a calm day. While the fish will eat mud minnows on the bottom, you can’t cover much water to locate fish this way and so if you aren’t fishing grubs you really aren’t fishing! Trout are often in the creek bends but not always, and there is not necessarily a lot of rhyme or reason to where they are stacked up.

Trolling is a very popular way to locate trout, and if you catch one or two then you should slow down and fish the area thoroughly. However, Ron prefers to put the trolling motor down and cast like a bass fisherman.

A variety of soft plastics on a 1/8 or 1/4 ounce jighead will catch fish. 

The redfish are very grouped up on the flats, and the best time to catch them has been the bottom of the outgoing to the first couple of hours of the incoming. In the clear conditions it is sight-fishing and if you find the fish you will catch them. Because the fish are spooky covering the flats with a trolling motor or poling is the best way to locate them, and you want to cast Gulp! or Zman soft plastics on a flutter hook past the school and then bring it back towards them to avoid scaring them. 

In the creeks the pattern is the same as it often is, and you should fish two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, and rocks in deep bends and holes. Fish are very grouped up and so when you find them they are usually pretty easy to catch. Mud minnows, cut mullet and Gulp! will all work. 

While many of them are small, in the creeks there are tons of black drum in holes and around downed trees.  They will take cut shrimp.  

Most of the sheepshead have already left, but on low tide around structure with about 8 feet of water you can still pick up some on fiddler crabs, oysters and clams. However, most of the fish are already at the reefs. 

Most flounder are also in the process of leaving or have left. 

There are still a lot of whiting in the surf.

On the nearshore structure there are a ton of big weakfish in 30-40 feet of water, and the best way to catch them is with a jigging spoon or bucktail. There are also bull red drum, sheepshead and black drum out there, and you can also find bull red drum feeding underneath the birds in 40-60 feet of water. Since water temperatures are still warm you can even find some big drum at the mouth of inlets in only 5-8 feet of water. 

The bottom fishing is very good in 60-90 feet of water. 

The wahoo fishing is really strong right now, and they are also picking up some tuna. 

December 2

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 55 degrees in the morning and both rivers remain clear.

As is the case every year the fishing continues to improve as temperatures drop but before they bottom out, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that big trout can be caught in both the creeks and near the ocean as the trout fishing is peaking in both areas. In the main rivers close to the sea DOA (or live) shrimp fished under a popping cork in the tide rips will work as long as there is clear water. Back in the creeks the DOA shrimp are not working as well, but the fish will eat a grub on a ¼ ounce jighead cast in the deep bends. Trolling is also an excellent way to locate the fish, and of course you should slow down and fish hard when you find them.

The main river redfish action is still very good on live shrimp or finger mullet around oyster beds, and low tide to mid-tide in either direction is now fishing well.  

Fish in the creeks are biting very well for two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, sea walls, and rock near deep bends and/ or holes. Finger mullet and shrimp will both work, and if you have shrimp on you should also pick up black drum in the same areas on low water. Good numbers of black drum are around right now. 

The sheepshead fishing remains absolutely phenomenal in 5-10 feet of water around structure at low tide, and this is the peak inshore fishing of the whole year. Fiddler crabs are still the best but other baits, including live shrimp, will now work.  

The flounder catch is slowing down but some fish are still around. The best way to target flounder is to slowly drag a finger mullet across the bottom. The better flounder fishing is now at the mouth of rivers and inlets close to the beach as flounder leave.

Whiting fishing is still good in the surf and around sandbars, where the bigger fish are usually found. Cut shrimp is hard to beat but cut mullet often catch bigger fish.

The bottom fishing remains very strong in 70-90 feet of water. 

There have been good numbers of tuna and wahoo caught. 

November 19

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 58 degrees in the morning. Both rivers are now clear. Small shrimp are still in the creeks, while the bigger ones are closer to the ocean. 

There’s not a lot of change in the fishing with conditions about the same as last week, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that big trout can be caught in both the creeks and near the ocean as the trout fishing is peaking in both areas. In the main rivers close to the sea DOA (or live) shrimp fished under a popping cork in the tide rips will work as long as there is clear water. Back in the creeks the DOA shrimp are not working as well, but the fish will eat a grub on a ¼ ounce jighead cast in the deep bends. Trolling is also an excellent way to locate the fish, and of course you should slow down and fish hard when you find them.

The main river redfish action is still very good on live shrimp or finger mullet around oyster beds, and low tide to mid-tide in either direction is now fishing well.  

Fish in the creeks are biting very well for two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, sea walls, and rock near deep bends and/ or holes. Finger mullet and shrimp will both work, and if you have shrimp on you should also pick up black drum in the same areas on low water. Good numbers of black drum are around right now. 

The flounder catch remains really strong with a healthy mix of sizes. The best way to target flounder is to slowly drag a finger mullet across the bottom. The better flounder fishing is now at the mouth of rivers and inlets close to the beach as flounder prepare to leave.

The sheepshead fishing remains absolutely phenomenal in 5-10 feet of water around structure at low tide, and this is the peak inshore fishing of the whole year. Fiddler crabs are still the best but other baits will now work.  

Whiting fishing is still really good, and in the surf numbers are high while at sandbars numbers and sizes can be impressive. On rough high tides when the water gets muddy at the mouth of inlets the fish will really feed. Cut shrimp is hard to beat but cut mullet often catch bigger fish.

For a couple of weeks the bull red drum fishing has been really good, particularly in the inlets and at the Edisto Rocks. You can also catch them in the surf but you really need some feature to hold them. 

Both menhaden and mullet will work for the bulls.

There are still bull reds, black drum, sheepshead and bluefish at the nearshore reefs.   

The bottom fishing remains very strong in 70-90 feet of water. 

There have been good numbers of tuna and wahoo caught. 

November 12

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 60 degrees in the morning. The water in the North Edisto is clear, while big tides have made the South Edisto dirty. Small shrimp are still in the creeks, while the bigger ones are closer to the ocean. 

We have reached the time of year where big trout can be caught in both the creeks and near the ocean, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that trout fishing is peaking in both areas.  In the main rivers close to the sea DOA (or live) shrimp fished under a popping cork in the tide rips will work as long as there is clear water. Back in the creeks the DOA shrimp are not working as well, but the fish will eat a grub on a ¼ ounce jighead cast in the deep bends. Trolling is also an excellent way to locate the fish, and of course you should slow down and fish hard when you find them.

The main river redfish action is still very good on live shrimp or finger mullet around oyster beds, and low tide to mid-tide in either direction is now fishing well.  

Fish in the creeks are biting very well for two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, sea walls, and rock near deep bends and/ or holes.  Finger mullet and shrimp will both work, and if you have shrimp on you should also pick up black drum in the same areas on low water.  Good numbers of black drum are around right now. 

A nice inshore catch
A nice inshore catch

The flounder catch remains really strong with a healthy mix of sizes. The best way to target flounder is to slowly drag a finger mullet across the bottom. The better flounder fishing is now at the mouth of rivers and inlets close to the beach as flounder prepare to leave.

The sheepshead fishing remains absolutely phenomenal in 5-10 feet of water around structure at low tide, and this is the peak inshore fishing of the whole year. Fiddler crabs are still the best but other baits will now work.  

Whiting fishing is still really good, and in the surf numbers are high while at sandbars numbers and sizes can be impressive.  On rough high tides when the water gets muddy at the mouth of inlets the fish will really feed. Cut shrimp is hard to beat but cut mullet often catch bigger fish.

For about a week the bull red drum fishing has been really good, particularly in the inlets and at the Edisto Rocks. You can also catch them in the surf but you really need some feature to hold them. 

Both menhaden and mullet will work for the bulls.

While Spanish mackerel have left the nearshore reefs, there are still bull reds, black drum, sheepshead and bluefish. 

The bottom fishing remains very strong in 70-90 feet of water. 

There have been good numbers of tuna and wahoo caught. 

November 5

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 68 degrees in the morning and the water is clear for the area. Bait is still prolific but shrimp are moving back in the direction of the ocean. 

Fall fishing is in full swing around Edisto Island, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the trout fishing is peaking for the year. Fish can be caught in the creeks as well as the main rivers on live shrimp, but with the shrimp headed back towards the ocean the rivers are fishing a little better. Shrimp under a popping cork are all you need.  

The main river redfish action is still very good on live shrimp or finger mullet, and on the flats the basic story is that if you find some fish they will eat. The mid-outgoing tide is the best time to fish, particularly around oyster beds. 

Fish in the creeks are biting very well for two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, sea walls, and rock near deep bends and/ or holes. Finger mullet are the best creek bait for redfish but shrimp will also work as the numbers of bait stealers are dropping. 

This week the black drum have also showed up in good numbers, and they are being caught in the creeks around trees and docks. Fiddler crabs and shrimp are both working. 

The flounder catch is really strong right now, with a healthy mix of sizes. The best way to target flounder is to slowly drag a finger mullet across the bottom. The better flounder fishing is now at the mouth of rivers and inlets close to the beach as flounder prepare to leave. 

The sheepshead fishing is absolutely phenomenal in 5-10 feet of water around structure at low tide, and this is the peak inshore fishing of the whole year. With so many bait stealers around you basically have to fish fiddler crabs.

Whiting fishing is still really good, and in the surf numbers are high while at sandbars numbers and sizes can be impressive. On rough high tides when the water gets muddy at the mouth of inlets the fish will really feed. Cut shrimp is hard to beat but cut mullet often catch bigger fish.

Bull red drum can be caught in the surf, around the inlets, and at the Edisto Rocks. Both menhaden and mullet will work for the bulls.

The nearshore reefs still have Spanish mackerel, but they are starting to leave. There are still redfish, whiting and flounder all over the reefs. Some are closer but more king mackerel are out in 60-90 feet of water. You can either slow troll live bait or pull spoons for them.      

The bottom fishing is very strong in 70-90 feet of water. 

There have been good numbers of tuna caught and a few wahoo. 

A good catch this week with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.
A good catch this week with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.

October 21

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 74 degrees in the morning and the water is clear for the area. Bait is still prolific but shrimp are starting to move back in the direction of the ocean. 

Fall fishing is in full swing around Edisto Island, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the trout fishing has been really good.  Fish can be caught in the creeks as well as the main rivers on live shrimp, but with the shrimp headed back towards the ocean the rivers are fishing a little better. Shrimp under a popping cork are all you need.   

The main river redfish action is still very good on live shrimp or finger mullet, and on the flats the basic story is that if you find some fish they will eat. The mid-outgoing tide is the best time to fish, particularly around oyster beds. 

Fish in the creeks are biting very well for two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, sea walls, and rock near deep bends and/ or holes. Finger mullet are the best creek bait because of all the bait stealers. 

The flounder catch is really strong right now, with a healthy mix of sizes. The best way to target flounder is to slowly drag a finger mullet across the bottom. As predicted the better flounder fishing is now at the mouth of rivers and inlets close to the beach as flounder prepare to leave. 

The sheepshead fishing is absolutely phenomenal in 5-10 feet of water around structure at low tide, and this is the peak inshore fishing of the whole year. With so many bait stealers around you basically have to fish fiddler crabs.

Whiting fishing is still really good, and in the surf numbers are high while at sandbars numbers and sizes can be impressive. On rough high tides when the water gets muddy at the mouth of inlets the fish will really feed. Cut shrimp is hard to beat but cut mullet often catch bigger fish.

Bull red drum can be caught in the surf, around the inlets, and at the Edisto Rocks. Both menhaden and mullet will work for the bulls.

The nearshore reefs are still loaded with Spanish mackerel, and there are also redfish, whiting and flounder all over the reefs. Some are closer but more king mackerel are out in 60-90 feet of water.  You can either slow troll live bait or pull spoons for them.      

The bottom fishing is very strong in 70-90 feet of water. 

There have been good numbers of tuna caught and a few wahoo. 

October 7

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are about 80 degrees in the morning and clarity is still high. There is tons of bait around and shrimping is very good. 

With water temperatures actually rising a degree from last week to this fish are still in a bit of a holding pattern, but Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) does report that the trout coming out of the South Edisto arm have gotten bigger. The fish in the North Edisto are still generally on the smaller side, but numbers are still very good in both locations. 

Fish are biting well on moving water off the rips, but better quality is coming further up the creeks. Live shrimp are working very well and some fish are also being caught on artificial lures. 

A nice trout caught this week with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.
A nice trout caught this week with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.

The main river redfish action is still very good on live shrimp or finger mullet, and on the flats the basic story is that if you find some fish they will eat. The mid-outgoing tide is the best time to fish, particularly around oyster beds. 

Fish in the creeks are biting very well for two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, sea walls, and rock near deep bends and/ or holes. Finger mullet are the best creek bait because of all the bait stealers. 

The flounder catch is still very good, and even though it’s a lot of small fish there are some good ones being caught. The best way to target flounder is to slowly drag a finger mullet across the bottom. Right now the fish are scattered everywhere but as temperatures cool they will move closer to the ocean. 

The sheepshead fishing is just getting good around inshore structure with 6-10 feet of water at low tide, and after the next cool front it should get really good. With so many bait stealers around you basically have to fish fiddler crabs.

Whiting fishing is still really good, and in the surf numbers are high while at sandbars numbers and sizes can be impressive. On rough high tides when the water gets muddy at the mouth of inlets the fish will really feed. Cut shrimp is hard to beat but cut mullet often catch bigger fish.

This is still the peak time for catching tarpon, and the best numbers of fish are in the ocean right now. The best way to locate them is to look for large menhaden schools and tarpon rolling on them and fish live baits.  It won’t be until water temperatures drop below the mid-70s that tarpon leave.   

The bull red drum are still pushing in, and they can be found around most any structure from about 18-20 feet out to the nearshore reefs in 30 plus feet. The nearshore reefs are also still loaded with Spanish mackerel, but for right now most of the king mackerel seem to be out in 60-90 feet (or more). The mullet run should be pulling them shallower but at the moment they are not seeing it.    

There are still plenty of spadefish at the Edisto 60 and 90, and with jelly balls around they are easier to catch. 

The bottom fishing remains very strong in 80-100 feet of water, with diminishing numbers of cobia on the bottom in 90-100 feet as they start to head south. 

When the water temperatures drop three to five degrees the tuna fishing will get very good, and if the wahoo bite is going to turn on that will be the time. There are also a ton of kings out towards the ledge while the sailfish are a little hit-or-miss. Ron has not heard any reports on marlin. 

September 30

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are down to 79 degrees in the morning and clarity is still high. There is tons of bait around and shrimping is very good. 

Without a significant reduction in water temperatures fish are in a bit of a holding pattern, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the trout bite is still strong, although most of the main river fish are still small. Fish are biting well on moving water off the rips in the rivers, but the biggest fish are actually coming in the creeks – although the numbers are lower. Live shrimp are working very well and some fish are also being caught on artificial lures. 

The main river redfish action is still very good on live shrimp or finger mullet, and on the flats the basic story is that if you find some fish they will eat. The mid-outgoing tide is the best time to fish, particularly around oyster beds. 

Fish in the creeks are biting very well for two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, sea walls, and rock near deep bends and/ or holes. Finger mullet are the best creek bait because of all the bait stealers. 

The flounder catch is still very good, and even though it’s a lot of small fish there are some good ones being caught. The best way to target flounder is to slowly drag a finger mullet across the bottom. Right now the fish are scattered everywhere but as temperatures cool they will move closer to the ocean. 

The sheepshead fishing is just getting good around inshore structure with 6-10 feet of water at low tide, and after the next cool front it should get really good. With so many bait stealers around you basically have to fish fiddler crabs.

Whiting fishing is still really good, and in the surf numbers are high while at sandbars numbers and sizes can be impressive. On rough high tides when the water gets muddy at the mouth of inlets the fish will really feed. Cut shrimp is hard to beat but cut mullet often catch bigger fish.

This is still the peak time for catching tarpon, and the best numbers of fish are in the ocean right now. The best way to locate them is to look for large menhaden schools and tarpon rolling on them and fish live baits.  

The biggest change with the nearshore fishing is that the bull red drum are starting to push in, and they can be found around most any structure from about 18-20 feet out to the nearshore reefs in 30 plus feet. The nearshore reefs are also still loaded with Spanish mackerel, but for right now most of the king mackerel seem to have pushed out to 60-90 feet (or more). The mullet run should be pulling them shallower but at the moment they are not seeing it.    

There are still plenty of spadefish at the Edisto 60 and 90, and with jelly balls around they are easier to catch. 

The bottom fishing remains very strong in 80-100 feet of water, with diminishing numbers of cobia on the bottom in 90-100 feet as they start to head south. 

When the water temperatures drop three to five degrees the tuna fishing will get very good, and if the wahoo bite is going to turn on that will be the time. There are also a ton of kings out towards the ledge while the sailfish are a little hit-or-miss. Ron has not heard any reports on marlin. 

September 17

Inshore surface water temperatures around Edisto Island are down to 83 degrees in the morning and clarity is high. There is tons of bait around and shrimping is very good. 

Even with water temperatures still in the 80s the hot fall action is starting, and Captain Ron Davis, Jr. (843-513-0143) reports that the trout bite has been strong, although a lot of the fish are still small. Fish are biting well on moving water off the rips in the rivers, but there are also starting to be some good catches in the creeks. Live shrimp are working very well and some fish are also being caught on artificial lures. 

The redfish action has also gotten really good on live shrimp, and on the flats the basic story is that if you find some fish they will eat. Yesterday Ron’s boat found some good schools with slot-sized fish as well as some overs and some unders. Mid-tides continue to fish the best, around oyster beds. 

Fish in the creeks are biting very well for two hours either side of low tide around downed trees, docks, sea walls, and rock near deep bends and/ or holes. Finger mullet are the best creek bait because of all the bait stealers. 

A big redfish caught this week with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.
A big redfish caught this week with Captain Ron Davis, Jr.

In the last couple of weeks the flounder catch has been very good, and even though it’s a lot of small fish there are some good ones being caught. The best way to target flounder is to slowly drag a finger mullet across the bottom. Right now the fish are scattered everywhere but as temperatures cool they will move closer to the ocean. 

The sheepshead fishing is just getting good around inshore structure with 6-10 feet of water at low tide, and after the next cool front it should get really good. With so many bait stealers around you basically have to fish fiddler crabs.

Whiting fishing is still really good, and in the surf numbers are high while at sandbars numbers and sizes can be impressive. On rough high tides when the water gets muddy at the mouth of inlets the fish will really feed. Cut shrimp is hard to beat but cut mullet often catch bigger fish.

This is the peak time for catching tarpon, and the best numbers of fish are in the ocean right now. The best way to locate them is to look for large menhaden schools and tarpon rolling on them and fish live baits.  

Nearshore reefs in 30 feet are still loaded with Spanish mackerel, but for right now most of the king mackerel seem to have pushed out to 60-90 feet (or more). The mullet run should be pulling them shallower but at the moment they are not seeing it.    

There are still plenty of spadefish at the Edisto 60 and 90, and with jelly balls around they are easier to catch.  Still, Ron caught them on shrimp the last time out. 

The bottom fishing remains very strong in 80-100 feet of water, with diminishing numbers of cobia on the bottom in 90-100 feet as they start to head south. 

When the water temperatures drop about five degrees the tuna fishing will get very good, and if the wahoo bite is going to turn on that will be the time. There are also a ton of kings out towards the ledge while the sailfish are a little hit-or-miss. Ron has not heard any report on marlin. 

Part of an impressive catchPart of an impressive catch

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