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AHQ INSIDER Lake Greenwood (SC) Spring 2021 Fishing Report – Updated April 30

  • by Jay

April 30

Lake Greenwood water levels are at 439.05 (full pool is 440.0) and the lake is generally clear. Water temperatures range from about 73-75 degrees.

The bass spawn on Lake Greenwood is winding down right now, but tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that the fishing may actually be picking up as the shad spawn gets underway. 20 pounds won a recent tournament.

The shad spawn bite is mostly a morning pattern, and first thing fish will be keying on spawning bait that is mostly oriented to points but also to some docks.  Spinnerbaits and topwater lures will work. More generally, bass will also be eating topwater lures first thing that are fished around sea walls.

There are also a fair number of fish that are getting out on deeper brush in 10-18 feet in both the creeks and the main lake. Ole monster worms and deep running crankbaits like the 6XD or DT16 will both work. 

The striped bass bite has come on nicely, and Guide Daniel Skipper (864-430-0488) reports that they are catching fishing pulling planer boards and free-lining live bait behind the boat in the mid-lake areas. Fish are generally in creeks and off points, and early you can fish shallow. Later in the day they move a little deeper. 

The post-spawn crappie fishing has also picked up, and while some fish are just recovering in open water there are other fish getting on brush in a summer pattern.  They will take minnows and jigs. Lake Greenwood is such a shallow lake that there is really no magical depth, and if you know where brush is you should check it whether it is in 3 feet or 20 feet. 

Even though he is on Clarks Hill more these days, Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that right now the best bet for catching channel catfish is to drift cut herring and shrimp. You can also anchor on points and humps in 5-25 feet of water with dip baits. To catch flatheads, anchor in the same areas with live bream and perch at night or target brush. 

April 16

Lake Greenwood water levels are at 439.06 (full pool is 440.0) and water temperatures are around 68 degrees. The very upper end and lower end of the lake are clear, while the middle section is dingy but not muddy. 

While we are probably in the overall middle of the bass spawn on Lake Greenwood right now, from what tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda has seen this week there are actually not a lot of good fish on beds at this moment.  Certainly there are some small ones up there, but he thinks another good wave is coming. 

You can catch both pre- and post-spawn fish shallow around docks and in spawning coves, and fishing a wacky rigged Senko Stan has had lots of bites. However, the better fish that he has caught have actual come off a deep rock pile on a ledge in about 15 feet of water. They were full of eggs. 

At the same time that there are some fish staging in deep water, Stan has also had some bites on a Whopper Plopper fished around the banks. 

Stan Gunter with a 7-pounder caught this week
Stan Gunter with a 7-pounder caught this week

While there could be some fish deeper, Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that overall the most productive bite remains in 3-15 feet of water.  The shallow water is already flooded with baitfish seeking warm water temperatures, and this is only accelerating as water temperatures warm further.  Shallow water in the backs of creeks and coves, shallow flats and even shallow humps in the main lake will all produce, and drifting and anchoring can be equally successful right now.  Cut threadfin shad, herring, and small pieces of gizzard shad will all catch fish, and particularly as the water warms over the next few weeks shrimp will get better and better.

April 2

Lake Greenwood water levels are at 439.34 (full pool is 440.0) and water temperatures were in the lower 60s before the cold snap. 

The bass are at all different stages of the spawn on Lake Greenwood, and veteran tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that right now some fish are pre-spawn, a lot are on beds and he thinks a lot have already finished spawning. While today his son saw a ton of fish on beds, Stan is starting to spend a lot of time concentrating on post-spawn fish. He is looking for them to set up around points and sea walls. He also really likes docks right now, which allow you to target both pre- and post-spawn fish. 

Floating worms and shakey heads are working well, and once this cold front passes he expects to catch fish on Tiny Torpedos and Bang O Lures again. 

Even though the cold front has slowed things down temporarily, Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that very soon Greenwood catfish will soon be found around shallow points, particularly in “secondary” creeks and coves that come off of major creeks or the main river runs. Fishing in the afternoon and evening can be the best of the day, as the sun heats up the water and pulls baitfish (and catfish) into the shallows.  Drifting through the shallows is probably the best pattern right now, particularly off the Reedy and Saluda Rivers. Cut herring and cut white perch are both good bait choices, and if anglers want to have the chance to catch a big flathead or two pulling a whole bream is a good option.

March 25

Lake Greenwood water levels are up to 438.54 (full pool is 440.0) and the lower lake is clear again. Water temperatures are around 60 degrees but rising rapidly. 

As promised, veteran tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that the bass fishing on Lake Greenwood has been a little tough recently. However, the latter part of this week and into the weekend he expects the fishing to get good and for a ton of fish to move onto beds. A floating worm is really hard to beat at this time of year on Lake Greenwood, and with this warming trend Stan will also be throwing topwater lures like a Bang O Lure or Torpedo. On the sub-surface side spinnerbaits will also work well. 

In addition to looking for fish in spawning pockets and on beds, fishing a shakey head around docks can be very effective.

Stan sent us this photo from the water today
Stan sent us this photo from the water today

March 19

Lake Greenwood water levels are up to 438.06 (full pool is 440.0). Water temperatures are in the mid-50s after the recent cold snap. 

It’s hard to generate momentum for the spring crappie spawn when the fish keep getting buffeted by cold fronts, and Guide Daniel Skipper (864-430-0488) reports that the lake will warm up a few degrees but then the gains will be offset by cooling. 

As a result there’s not much change in the pattern, and long-line trolling on the river channel and in the creeks remains the best technique. It shouldn’t be until April that the Greenwood fish are on the banks and spawning. 

Daniel’s preferred technique in March is to put half of his jigs out plain on one side of the boat, and to tip the other half with minnows. Then you can see which is working better on a particular day. 

A good day on Greenwood this week with Daniel Skipper
A good day on Greenwood this week with Daniel Skipper

Daniel isn’t guiding for Greenwood striped bass right now, but they are still on flats right off the river channel.  Free lines and planer boards are most productive. 

The catfish bite is still decent, and even though Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) is on Clarks Hill more these days it seems that most of the fish are still relating to the river channel and deep flats in 10-30 feet of water. Drifting with cut herring or white perch has been most productive.

Bass report to follow.

March 11

Lake Greenwood water levels are up to 436.88 (full pool is 440.0) and the lake is finally beginning to clear. Water temperatures are in the low to mid-50s. 

At last the crappie fishing is starting to turn around on Lake Greenwood, and Guide Daniel Skipper (864-430-0488) reports that while numbers are still not as good as Clarks Hill it’s at least worth being back on the lake.

The pattern is long-line trolling in whatever area you mark fish during this prespawn period, and it shouldn’t be until April that the Greenwood fish are on the banks and spawning. Crappie are on the river channel and also in the creeks as water levels start to normalize.

Daniel’s preferred technique in March is to put half of his jigs out plain on one side of the boat, and to tip the other half with minnows. Then you can see which is working better on a particular day. 

A couple of good ones caught with Guide Daniel Skipper
A couple of good ones caught with Guide Daniel Skipper

The bass fishing is also improving on Lake Greenwood, and veteran tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that as the water warms fish are being caught on the corners of steep rocky banks outside of spawning areas. A #5 Shad Rap is hard to beat right now. Fish are also staging at docks adjacent to spawning pockets, with spinnerbaits, jigs, and Chatterbaits all working around docks.

By this weekend there should also be some fish in the spawning pockets, and perhaps even on beds!

Daniel Skipper isn’t guiding for Greenwood striped bass right now, but they are still on flats right off the river channel.  Free lines and planer boards are most productive. 

The catfish bite is still decent, and even though Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) is on Clarks Hill more these days it seems that most of the fish are still relating to the river channel and deep flats in 10-30 feet of water. Drifting with cut herring or white perch has been most productive.  

March 4

Lake Greenwood water levels are up to 436.55 (full pool is 440.0) and the lake remains very muddy. Water temperatures are in the lower 50s. 

There are glimmers of hope on the horizon, but right now Guide Daniel Skipper (864-430-0488) reports that the crappie fishing on Lake Greenwood is as tough as he has ever seen it. This is largely a function of the water conditions, which are several feet down and very muddy.  However, water levels are beginning to rise (and promised to be back to full pool by April) and if the rain holds off the lake should clear.

Even though nothing is very good right now, in general the pattern should be long-line trolling in whatever area you mark fish. This is the prespawn period, and it shouldn’t be until April that the Greenwood fish should be on the banks and spawning. The crappie are as likely to be in the creeks as the river channel on Lake Greenwood in March, but low water levels have kept them out of the creeks so far this month.  

Daniel’s preferred technique in March is to put half of his jigs out plain on one side of the boat, and to tip the other half with minnows. Then you can see which is working better on a particular day. 

While the bass fishing has been pretty tough on Lake Greenwood, veteran tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that seasonal changes are starting to improve the bite and the fish are starting to set up for the spawn. They would be even further along were it not for recent cold fronts, but right now you can catch them in about 5-10 feet of water in staging areas out from locations where they will eventually spawn. Some fish are already as shallow as 3-6 feet, and since they move a lot at this time of year keep looking.   

The best areas to search for fish right now have sharp depth changes as well as some sort of cover, including docks, rock, little brush piles or lay downs.  Spinnerbaits and Chatterbaits are fishing the best right now. 

Generally Daniel Skipper doesn’t focus too much on the Greenwood striped bass while the crappie should be feeding very well in the pre-spawn period, but with the crappie not doing very well he is finding striper on flats right off the river channel.  The whole lake is the same temperature right now so they can be found from one end of the lake to the other. Free lines and planer boards are most productive. 

The catfish bite is still decent, but Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that the fish are starting to get more scattered all along the river channel and deep flats in 10-30 feet of water. Drifting with cut herring or white perch has been working productive.  

You can also still head up the rivers and drift in 10-20 feet.

A nice haul with Guide Daniel Skipper

February 26

Lake Greenwood water levels are down to 436.40 (full pool is 440.0) and particularly the upper end is very muddy. Water temperatures are around 50 degrees. 

The bass fishing has been tough on Lake Greenwood, and veteran tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that in tournaments last weekend there was only one limit caught! Still, a couple of anglers have managed to catch some good fish by throwing an Alabama rig on the lower end in areas with some cleaner water.  

The bite out deep has fallen off. 

Fishing should improve as temperatures rise and the mud settles out. 

It’s also been really tough conditions for crappie fishing on Lake Greenwood, and Guide Daniel Skipper (864-430-0488) reports that the lake has been so muddy that nothing is working very well. Still about the best of some bad options is tight-lining around bridges on the upper end or looking for fish on the lower end that are suspending in the mouth of creeks and getting ready to push in. 

The striped bass are also unhappy with all the mud, and Daniel reports that fishing has been tough.  The best of some bad patterns is to look for bait schools on the lower end and troll umbrella rigs or throw bucktails.  

The catfish are happier in the mud than other species, and Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that the best pattern is to head up Saluda and Reedy Rivers and drift in 8-20 feet of water with cut herring, shad or white perch.

February 18

Lake Greenwood water levels are way up to 436.93 (full pool is 440.0). The upper end is already a mud hole, and while right now the lower end is just dingy it will be coming down. At the moment the mud line is around the state park. Water temperatures are in the upper 40s. 

All this muddy water is not exactly ideal, and veteran tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that without a doubt he would be concentrating on the lower end while it is still cleaner. There have been some good catches recently on a Rattle Trap/ Red Eye Shad fished on rocky, secondary points in the creeks on the lower end, and for some reason the color gold has been really good. You can also drag a jig on rocky points. 

Once there is no choice but to fish in the mud then Stan suggests a fire tiger crankbait, or when it warms a couple of degrees a spinnerbait or Chatterbait. 

This is starting to sound like a broken record in a very wet 2021, but unlike other species the catfish are unaffected by the mud or even drawn to it.  Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) advises heading up the Saluda and Reedy Rivers and drifting 8-20 feet of water with cut herring, shad or white perch. Fish movements can be erratic with all the inflow but these can be some good conditions for Greenwood channels.

New crappie and striped bass reports to follow from Guide Daniel Skipper (864-430-0488).

February 4

Lake Greenwood water levels are at 434.39 (full pool is 440.0). Water temperatures are about 46 degrees and the lake is still muddy with the lower lake a bit better.   

Despite still-tough water conditions the crappie fishing on Lake Greenwood has significantly improved, and Guide Daniel Skipper (864-430-0488) reports that yesterday they caught 25+ fish tight-lining around bridges on the upper end. Fish were near the bottom about 20 feet down, and they came on a combination of minnows and jigs.

This is a typical pattern this time of year, and the other primary pattern is to look for fish on the lower end that are suspending in the mouth of creeks and getting ready to push in. Not unusually for February the bridge pattern is a little better right now. 

Caught with Guide Daniel Skipper this week
Caught with Guide Daniel Skipper this week

There’s not a whole lot of change in the striped bass pattern, and Daniel reports that fish can be found anywhere on the lake. The key pattern on both ends of the lake is casting at birds, but because the upper end is so shallow you can’t rely on electronics and probably need to see swirls or something else before casting. The fish are just roaming and following shad that have slowed down or are dying in the cold. Overall the better fishing right now seems to be on the lower end.

Bucktails and Alabama rigs are both working pretty well, and you can also troll the rigs.  

There’s not a whole lot of change in the bass on Lake Greenwood, but tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that there have been some pretty good bags caught – including a 20-pound sack that won a recent tournament. While there are other patterns right now, this is the absolute prime time for Alabama rigs on the lake. Greenwood fish tend to be a little shallower, and just running the banks with an A-rig is one productive pattern around docks, shallow brush, etc. You can also fish it deeper over brush piles, and a jerkbait will also fish well 8-10 feet down over brush in about 18 feet.  This is better in clear water. 

Check out the newLake Greenwood Catch ’Em Kits with lures hand-picked for each season by Stan.

Unlike other species the catfish are unaffected by the mud or even drawn to it, and Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) advises heading up the Saluda and Reedy Rivers and drifting 8-20 feet of water with cut herring, shad or white perch. Fish movements can be erratic with all the inflow but these can be some good conditions for Greenwood channels.

January 20

Lake Greenwood water levels are at 434.46 (full pool is 440.0). They are pulling water through the lake so hard that the dam is actually muddier than the rivers, but the whole lake is dirty. Water temperatures range from 45-48 degrees.

Cold, muddy water makes for tough fishing conditions most of the time, and Guide Daniel Skipper (864-430-0488) reports that right now is no exception. The striped bass fishing has gotten tougher, and even though fish are spread out over the whole lake they aren’t feeding very well. 

Fish could be found on the bank one second and in 25 feet of water the next, and basically the key is to follow the gulls and loons and try to keep up with them as they roam and chase bait. They are most likely to be found on the main channel but that is not even a given. 

The best way to target the fish is by trolling artificial baits such as umbrella rigs or casting at the birds, and they are on fairly small bait so rig your lines accordingly.  

 A nice white bass caught recently with Guide Daniel Skipper
A nice white bass caught recently with Guide Daniel Skipper

As the striper fishing has deteriorated unfortunately the crappie fishing has stayed tough, as the combination of muddy, cold water and ripping current is less than ideal.   

The best of a lot of bad bets is still tight-lining or long-lining in 15-20 feet of water for scattered fish that could be in the creeks or main lake. Jigs tipped with minnows are the best option and fish could be suspended well off the bottom. 

The Lake Greenwood bass are still in winter patterns, but naturally that bite has gotten pretty tough, too. Tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that cold, muddy water is also not helping the bass bite.

Even though none are great there are a few patterns you can fish, and the best of some bad options in the dirty water may be fishing a crankbait around rocky points and steep rocky banks in 6-10 feet of water. People are also still throwing Alabama rigs around docks, channel swings and points. Finally, in areas where you see birds you can fish a jigging spoon in 18-25 feet.

Check out the new Lake Greenwood Catch ’Em Kits with lures hand-picked for each season by Stan.

The only bright spot is that catfish are least affected by the mud of the various species, and Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that with cats drawn to the muddy inflow either following the bait or perhaps looking for something else to eat the best pattern is still to drift creek or main lake areas with fresh water coming in with cut herring, perch or shad. They could be at any depth but 10-25 feet is a good range to start out searching.

Still, Lake Greenwood does not have blue catfish – which still feed heavily in winter – and the population of channels and flatheads which slow down in the colder months are also less than ravenous. 

January 13

Lake Greenwood water levels are down to 436.06 (full pool is 440.0). Most of the lake is now muddy, although the lower end is a bit better, and water temperatures are in the upper 40s. 

The lake is muddy and the temperature is about the same from the dam to the rivers, and as a result Guide Daniel Skipper (864-430-0488) reports that striped bass can be found from one end of the lake to the other. They could also be found on the bank one second and in 25 feet of water the next, and so basically the key is to follow the gulls and loons and try to keep up with them as they roam and chase bait. They are most likely to be found on the main channel but that is not even a given. 

The best way to target the fish is by trolling artificial baits such as umbrella rigs or casting at the birds, and they are on fairly small bait so rig your lines accordingly.  Overall the bite is fairly good. 

While the striper fishing is okay the crappie fishing is just tough, and in the 2-day South Carolina Crappie Association tournament this weekend only two teams had a limit of seven fish both days.  And these are some of the very best crappie fishermen in the state. Between muddy, cold water and ripping current as they try to keep the lake low the conditions are very difficult and Daniel is turning away guide parties. 

While nothing is good the best bet is tight-lining or long-lining in 15-20 feet of water for scattered fish that could be in the creeks or main lake. Jigs tipped with minnows are the best option and fish could be suspended well of the bottom. 

The Lake Greenwood bass are still in winter pattern, which means throwing Alabama rigs around docks, channel swings and points. Tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports you can also chase the birds like a striper fisherman and cast lures to bass mixed in with striper, and perhaps the best pattern is to fish a jigging spoon in 18-25 feet in the areas where you are seeing birds.

With the dirty water there can also be a shallow pattern fishing a crankbait around rocky points and steep rocky banks in 6-10 feet of water. 

Check out the new Lake Greenwood Catch ’Em Kits with lures hand-picked for each season by Stan.

Stan Gunter with a good Greenwood fish
Stan Gunter with a good Greenwood fish

It’s a decent time for catfish on Lake Greenwood, and Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that with cats drawn to the muddy inflow either following the bait or perhaps looking for something else to eat the best pattern is still to drift creek or main lake areas with fresh water coming in with cut herring, perch or shad. They could be at any depth but 10-25 is a good range to start out searching.

January 8

Lake Greenwood water levels rose more than two feet but are slightly down to 437.36  (full pool is 440.0). Much of the lake is muddy but the water is still fairly clear on the lower end. 

You can still catch Lake Greenwood bass fishing crankbaits around points, and there is certainly still a pattern throwing Alabama rigs around docks, channel swings and the like. However, tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that right now one of the best ways to catch bass can be to chase the birds like a striper fisherman. They are of course catching plenty of striped bass this way, but they are also getting spots and largemouth throwing bucktails and small swimbaits. When gulls are swooping down fish are obviously feeding under them, but you can also fish a jigging spoon in 18-25 feet in the areas where they have been and catch fish. Dropping a swimbait or Alabama rig in the same areas will also work. You just need to idle around in areas where you have seen the fish to locate them. 

Check out the new Lake Greenwood Catch ’Em Kits with lures hand-picked for each season by Stan.

While the patterns remain similar the influx of fresh, muddy water has changed the locations of catfish on Lake Greenwood, and Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that unlike some other species cats are drown to the inflow either following the bait or perhaps looking for something else to eat.  The best pattern right now is to drift creek or main lake areas with fresh water coming in with cut herring, perch or shad. They could be at any depth but 10-25 is a good range to start out searching.

December 20

Lake Greenwood water levels are at 435.86 (full pool is 440.0) and surface water temperatures are 54-56 degrees. The upper end is dingy to dirty but the mid-lake down is pretty good and the lower end is clear. 

Even though Lake Greenwood is not yet as cold as you might expect after some chilly weather, tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that bass are getting into winter patterns and making a move back to the main lake right now. They are starting to hang around rocky points and steep rocky banks in 6-10 feet of water, but wood close to deep water and channel swings are also holding fish. Square-bills, Shad Raps, and of course Alabama rigs are all working right now. If the water is not too deep a suspending jerkbait is a good option. 

Stan Gunter with some nice fish caught this week
Stan Gunter with some nice fish caught this week

He is on Clarks Hill more these days, but Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that with baitfish starting to gather up pretty thick in or near the main river channel and some of the big feeder creek channels the catfish are right there with them.  On the upper half of the lake they are in 15-25 feet, and on the lower half 25-35 feet.  Drift the areas with the best concentrations of bait with cut herring, perch or shad.

November 24

Lake Greenwood is at 437.52 (full pool is 440.0) and surface water temperatures are in the mid-60s. Up the lake is dirtier while the water down the lake is cleaner. 

It’s one of those tougher times on Lake Greenwood when some anglers are catching fish but many are not, and tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that it is still taking about 15 or 16 pounds to win recent bass tournaments.  Fish are in the creeks and shallower pockets on the main lake, and as water temperatures drop the bite is shifting from more of a topwater/ buzzbait bite over to submerged baits. Crankbaits including square-bills and Shad Raps, Rattle Traps and spinnerbaits are catching fish. Alabama rigs are always good in the cool months on Lake Greenwood and that bite is also starting to come on around points and docks. Up the lake flashier, louder and brighter baits are needed while down the lake in the cleaner water more shad-colored baits will work. 

Stan Gunter with a Greenwood bass caught this week
Stan Gunter with a Greenwood bass caught this week

He is on Clarks Hill more these days, but Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that drifting 20-30 feet of water in the main lake is the best way to catch channel catfish on Greenwood right now.  Both shrimp and cut herring will work.  Anchoring on main lake channel ledges with live bream is the best way to catch a big flathead.

November 12

Lake Greenwood is at 438.62 (full pool is 440.0) and surface water temperatures are around 68-70 degrees. The lake was fairly clear before this rain but is getting dirty as water levels rapidly rise. 

Lake Greenwood is fishing okay but not great, and tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that it has been taking about 15 pounds to win recent bass tournaments. Even though it’s mid-November warm water temperatures mean that the fish have not gotten way back in the creeks, and so Stan still advises running main lake pockets and the front ¼ of the creeks with a buzzbait all day long. When water temperatures drop a few more degrees then the better pattern will be fishing a Rattle Trap or spinnerbait further back, but the fish just aren’t there right now.

Even though it’s not cold, in the late fall on Lake Greenwood it can be hard to beat an Alabama rig.  Starting now and even more so when temperatures hit the mid-60s Stan suggests running the banks and targeting points and docks with the A-rig. 

He is on Clarks Hill more these days, but Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that drifting 20-30 feet of water in the main lake is the best way to catch channel catfish on Greenwood right now.  Both shrimp and cut herring will work.  Anchoring on main lake channel ledges with live bream is the best way to catch a big flathead.

October 23

Lake Greenwood is at 438.98 (full pool is 440.0) and surface water temperatures are around 72-74 degrees. 

Even as Lake Murray bass fishing has recovered in the past couple of weeks, it’s quite possible that Greenwood is still out-fishing its big brother to the south. Tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that the Greenwood bass are still in the creeks following the shad schools, but the most exciting development this week is that there has been good schooling activity over brush piles in 15-18 feet of water in the main lake. You can also fish flats on the main lake that have stumps.  

When fish are not schooling it’s hard to beat picking up a buzzbait and just putting the trolling motor down and fishing the creek banks.  While you generally want to follow the bank contour to fish, there are also times that fish will get out in the middle of the backs of creeks. Square-billed crankbaits and Shad Raps are both effective for these fish which will still generally be in 10 feet of water or less. Since the fish are following shad you need to concentrate on areas with bait. 

He is on Clarks Hill more these days, but Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that drifting flats in 18-25 feet of water with herring, shrimp and white perch remains the best way to put channel catfish in the boat. Anchoring on channel ledges with live bream is the best way to catch a big flathead.  

October 9

Lake Greenwood is down to 438.97 (full pool is 440.0) and surface water temperatures are around 72-74 degrees. 

The tailwaters of Lake Greenwood make up the headwaters of Lake Murray, but with the way they are fishing for bass right now you would think they were hundreds of miles apart instead of that the two lakes sit right beside each other. According to veteran tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda that is largely because of blueback herring, and right now it is in Greenwood’s favor that there are no herring to deal with. 

As a result bass are doing what they are supposed to do in the fall, and they have gotten back in the creeks following the shad schools. Catching fish is really as simple as putting the trolling motor down and fishing the banks in the creeks, and a buzzbait has been very hard to beat recently. Shad Raps and square-billed crankbaits will also work well. 

While you generally want to follow the bank contour to fish, there are also times that fish will get out in the middle of the backs of creeks.  They will still generally be in 10 feet of water or less, and of course you should look out for schooling and have a topwater tied on. 

Since the fish are following shad you will get more bites in areas with bait. 

He is on Clarks Hill more these days, but Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that drifting flats in 18-25 feet of water with herring, shrimp and white perch is the best way to put channel catfish in the boat.  Anchoring on channel ledges with live bream is the best way to catch a big flathead.

An impressive flathead caught with Captain Chris Simpson
An impressive flathead caught with Captain Chris Simpson

September 17

Lake Greenwood is down to 439.68 (full pool is 440.0) and surface water temperatures have dropped into the lower 80s. The lake is in good shape with fairly good water clarity from top to bottom (before today’s rains). 

Even as water temperatures have dropped a couple more degrees there’s not a lot of change from last week on Lake Greenwood, and veteran tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that bass are still schooling a bit on the lake. This will only get better. For right now the fish are schooling off points or over brush piles – they are living in the brush but will come up to feed. Until water temperatures drop more the action is mostly taking place on the main lake, but look for bait to start to transition into the creeks soon and for bass to follow them. Sammys, Tiny Torpedos and Gunfish will all work.

When you don’t see fishing schooling for now the primary pattern is still to fish the brush in 15-20 feet with a big worm or crankbait. And be ready with a topwater when the fish come up schooling.

You can also throw a Pop-R or floating worm around sea walls first thing. 

Stan Gunter caught this pig last week 
Stan Gunter caught this pig last week

He is on Clarks Hill more these days, but Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that right now drifting across flats in the 10-20 foot range with shrimp, shad, herring and white perch remains the best way to put channel catfish in the boat.  Anchoring on points near the river channel is the best way to catch a big flathead.

September 11

Lake Greenwood is at 439.05 (full pool is 440.0) and surface water temperatures have dropped into the low to mid-80s. 

Some seasonal changes are starting to take place on Lake Greenwood, and veteran tournament angler Stan Gunter of Saluda reports that bass are starting to school more on the lake. This will only get better. For right now the fish are schooling off points or over brush piles – they are living in the brush but will come up to feed. Until water temperatures drop more the action is mostly taking place on the main lake, but look for bait to start to transition into the creeks soon and for bass to follow them. Sammys, Tiny Torpedos and Gunfish will all work.

While it won’t be long until other fall patterns kick in, for now the best primary pattern is probably to fish the brush in 15-20 feet with a big worm or crankbait. And be ready with a topwater when the fish come up schooling.

You can also throw a Pop-R or floating worm around sea walls first thing.  

Stan Gunter with a good one caught recently
Stan Gunter with a good one caught recently

He is on Clarks Hill more these days, but Captain Chris Simpson (864-992-2352) reports that right now drifting across flats in the 10-20 foot range with shrimp, shad, herring and white perch is still the best way to put channel catfish in the boat.  Anchoring on points near the river channel is the best way to catch a big flathead.

 

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