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AHQ INSIDER Lake Monticello (SC) Fall 2019 Fishing Report – Updated August 22

  • by Jay

The newest Lake Monticello fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-lake-monticello-sc-fall-2019-fishing-report/

August 22

Lake Monticello water temperatures are in the upper 80s, and the water is typically clear.  Lake levels normally fluctuate daily.

Some seasonal cooling could see the bassbite pick up on Lake Monticello, but for now FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that it’s still a tough time to fish.  The most consistent fishing is now in 10-15 feet of water, and fish are generally related to any significant piece of cover be it a brush pile, isolated piece of wood, rock pile, or stump.  Use your electronics to identify the best cover.

The best bite is still coming by down-sizing to the smallest, most finesse-oriented baits. Roboworms on a drop shot will work as well as anything.

There is also a small window early and late where you can catch fish on topwater lures.

The catfish bite is still in a summer pattern on Lake Monticello, and Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that means that the best thing going is still fishing for numbers of fish using the free-line drifting method. Small pieces of herring drifted in the top of the water column over deep water will catch fish of a variety of sizes, mostly in the 1-5-10 pound range, but with the chance at the occasional bigger one.

The results of recent tournaments show that the big fish bite is pretty tough, but you can still fish on deep humps or long points in 40 to 70 feet by anchoring lines at different depths along the structure to see how deep fish are holding on a particular day. The big fish just aren’t biting much during the day, but if you want to improve your chances of catching a good one fishing from midnight until about 9 a.m. may be the best window.

During the day a lot of the bigger fish may be suspended in 40-60 feet of water, and so one alternative pattern is to fish with down-lines as if you are after striper. It can be a hit-or-miss pattern but some good ones are being caught this way.

August 1

Lake Monticello water temperatures are in the upper 80s, and the water is typically clear.  Lake levels normally fluctuate daily.

The deep summer bassbite lasted longer than usual this summer on Lake Monticello, but FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that the deep schools are pretty much broken up.  Fish have moved shallow and scattered out, and the most consistent fishing is now in 10-15 feet of water.  Fish are related to any significant piece of cover, be it a brush pile, isolated piece of wood, rock pile, or stump.  Use your electronics to identify the best cover.

The best bite is coming by down-sizing to the smallest, most finesse-oriented baits.  Roboworms on a drop shot will work as well as anything.

There is also a small window early and late where you can catch fish on topwater lures.

With the spawn effectively finished the catfish bite is improving on Lake Monticello, but Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that the best thing going is still fishing for numbers of fish using the free-line drifting method.  Small pieces of herring drifted in the top of the water column over deep water will catch fish of a variety of sizes, mostly in the 1-5-10 pound range, but with the chance at the occasional bigger one.

For larger fish the best bet is still to anchor on deep humps or long points in 40 to 70 feet, with lines at different depths along the structure to see how deep fish are holding on a particular day.  A variety of cut baits are working.  Fish will move shallower at night.

July 24

Lake Monticello water temperatures are in the upper 80s, and the water is typically clear.  Lake levels normally fluctuate daily.

Even in the heat of summer bassfishing is pretty good on Lake Monticello, and FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that fish are still schooled up out deep in 30-40 feet of water.  Fish are near the bottom around offshore structure, and Carolina rigs and drop shots will work.  Because of less tournament pressure this summer they are also eating spoons, crankbaits and other big baits later into the season than usual.

Before too long fish should move shallower into the 10-15 foot range and scatter out.

With the spawn pretty much over it’s getting to be a better time to catch catfish on Lake Monticello, but Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that the best thing going is still fishing for numbers of fish using the free-line drifting method.  Small pieces of herring drifted in the top of the water column over deep water will catch fish of a variety of sizes, mostly in the 1-5-10 pound range, but with the chance at the occasional bigger one.

For larger fish the best bet is to anchor on deep humps or long points in 40 to 70 feet, with lines at different depths along the structure to see how deep fish are holding on a particular day.  A variety of cut baits are working.  Fish will move shallower at night.

June 21

Lake Monticello water temperatures are in the mid-80s, and the water is typically clear.  Lake levels normally fluctuate daily.

The transition is pretty much over on Lake Monticello, and FLW angler Andy Wicker of Pomaria reports that most of the bass have already made their way out to deep water 20-45 feet down.  The majority of bass are holding within 3-4 feet of the bottom, and they will take spoons, big crankbaits and even Alabama rigs.

By the second week of July the fish may slow down on the moving baits, and then it will be time to fish shakey heads, drop shots or Carolina rigs.

There are some fish that can still be picked up early and late around the banks on topwater lures, but the majority of the fish are out deeper.

It’s not a good time to target big catfish on Lake Monticello, but Captain William Attaway (803-924-0857) reports that this is the peak time of the year to get numbers of fish using the free-line drifting method.  Small pieces of herring drifted in the top of the water column over deep water will catch fish of a variety of sizes, mostly in the 1-5-10 pound range, but with the chance at the occasional bigger one.

For larger fish the best bet remains to anchor on humps or long points from 10 to 35 feet, with rods at different depths along the structure to see how deep fish are holding on a particular day.  A variety of cut baits are working.  Fish will move shallower at night.

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