Reel in the big fish with one of our handpicked fishing reels. Shop by brand or reel type.

Shop our collection of fishing rods to find the one that best matches your needs.

AHQ INSIDER South Grand Strand (SC) Summer 2019 Fishing Report – Updated June 27

  • by Jay

The newest South Grand Strand fishing report can be found at: http://www.anglersheadquarters.com/ahq-insider-south-grand-strand-sc-summer-2019-fishing-report/

June 27

Inshore water temperatures at the Murrells Inlet jetties are in the lower 80s.  Shrimp in the creeks are bait-sized, and finger mullet are just getting there.  Menhaden have moved into the area.  Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) has regular and jumbo mud minnows, live shrimp, live fiddler crabs, live finger mullet, live pinfish, salt clam, salt sand fleas as well as a full range of frozen baits.

Captain J Baisch (843-902-0356) reports that the most exciting development this week is that the king and Spanish mackerel have moved in really close following the schools of menhaden, and there have been some phenomenal catches off the piers (Apache Pier had 30 in one day) as well as out at the 3-Mile.  You can catch them trolling cigar minnows, smaller ballyhoo, or pulling live bait.

Just another great day for king mackerel with Captain J. Baisch
Just another great day for king mackerel with Captain J. Baisch

Flounder fishing has gotten a little spotty on the sound end of the Grand Strand, and some days they will get a bunch of keepers, and other days they will not.  It appears that the fish are schooled up pretty well, and so if you find the schools you do well – but if not you don’t.  Fish can be caught on mullet or mud minnows fished on Carolina rigs or jigheads, and for right now the fishing seems to be a little better at the jetties or in creeks closer to the ocean.  Out at the wrecks in the 30 or 40 feet of water there is good flounder fishing.

While there are still some reports of big trout being seen at the jetties, no one is catching them there on hook-and-line.  Probably the best way to catch trout is to throw topwater lures early, particularly on a morning high tide when you can cast over oyster beds.

While inshore redfish action has been a little slow, at the tips of the jetties they are catching some big reds on cut mullet as long as there is current and moving water. There are also sheepshead being caught on fiddler crabs at the jetties.

Black drumare still mainly small right now.

In the surf pompanoand whitingfishing remains really good, and there are plenty of sand fleas for bait.  There are also a few tarponin the area as well as at the Georgetown jetties.

45 miles offshore there is a buffet of bottom fish, including grouper, snapper, triggerfish, porgies and more.

June 21

Inshore water temperatures at the Murrells Inlet jetties are in the lower 80s.

Flounderfishing has been strong on the sound end of the Grand Strand, and Captain J Baisch (843-902-0356) also of Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that in a local flounder tournament last week the winning fish was over 6 pounds and second place was not far off.  Fish can be caught on mullet or mud minnows fished on Carolina rigs or jigheads, and for right now the fishing seems to be a little better at the jetties or in creeks closer to the ocean.

A good catch with bait from Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle
A good catch with bait from Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle

There have also been some big trout out at the jetties, although targeting them is a little hit-or-miss.  Probably the best way to catch trout is to throw topwater lures early, particularly on a morning high tide when you can cast over oyster beds.

The finger mullet have just gotten big enough to use for bait, and live mud minnows and cut mullet are also working for redfish in deeper holes inside the creeks.  While available you can’t really use shrimp because you will get pecked to death by bait stealers.

While black drumare around they are mainly small right now.

In the surf pompanoand whiting are both around, and there are plenty of sand fleas for bait.  The key is to find the clearest water possible.

The king mackerel fishing continues to be phenomenal from the beach to the Gulf Stream.  The best concentrations of fish are in 35-40 feet of water, and you can catch them trolling cigar minnows, smaller ballyhoo, or pulling live bait.  There are also some cobiaaround the bait schools.

Spanish mackerel fishing is also strong, and they seem to be feeding on glass minnows but pushing schools of menhaden in order to corral the glass minnows.

The occasional early tarpon has been spotted.

May 23

Inshore water temperatures at the Murrells Inlet jetties are in the mid to upper 70s, and overall the water is very clear.

Flounderfishing is still a little slow on the South Grand Strand, but Captain J Baisch (843-902-0356) also of Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) in Murrells Inlet reports that there is some really good fishing at the jetties. Sheepsheadare eating fiddler crabs well on the rocks, and black drumare also mixed in with the sheeps. At the tip of both jetties you can fish cut shrimp on the bottom, and even though you will have to weed through pinfish there are plenty of drum around.  Low tide is the best time.

There are also a pile of bluefish on the jetties, as well as plenty of 13-15 inch Spanish mackerel.  Trolling Christmas tree rigs on planers at the mouth of the Inlet and around the jetties is a good pattern.

In the surf there has been a really strong start to pompano season, and when the water is blue the action is best.  You can also catch as many bluefish as you want in the surf as well as some big whiting.  There are also some black drum in the surf.

Menhaden just showed up off the beaches, and even though king mackerel fishing was a little off around the full moon it is picking up again.  Instead of trolling cigar minnows at 3.5 miles per hour soon they will be pulling menhaden as slow as the boat will go.  There are also some big Spanish around that will start feeding close in as the mullet get bigger.  Spadefish are also showing up, and cobia are just arriving.

Offshore, Georgetown Landing Marina (843-546-1776) reports that wahoo, blackfin tuna and dolphin have been caught.  This is an excellent time to catch dolphin.

Another nice king mackerel caught with Captain J Baisch
Another nice king mackerel caught with Captain J Baisch

May 7

Inshore water temperatures at the Murrells Inlet jetties are in the lower 70s, and overall the water has been very clean.

It’s been a slightly slow week inshore on the South Grand Strand, but Captain J Baisch (843-902-0356) also of Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) in Murrells Inlet reports that there are still fish to be caught in the inlet.  On low tide they have been catching some black drumon cut shrimp, and at the jetties there have been plenty of sheepsheadas the fish have finished spawning and moved back to the rocks.

While there are plenty of flounder around, there don’t seem to be very many keepers right now.  Trouthave also been really spread out, and the redfish have been a little off.

Surf fishing has been very good, however, and with lots of good clean water the pompanobite has gotten off to an excellent early start. There have also been some huge whiting caught such as the 17-inch fish pictured below, with fresh salted sand fleas available at the store working very well for both as well as some black drum.  Cut mullet have also been catching lots of bluefish as well as some whiting.

Captain J's brother with a monster whiting
Captain J’s brother with a monster whiting

From the jetties out to the 3-Mile Reef Spanish mackerel fishing has been strong, with the Spanish mixed in with bluefish.  ¾ ounce iron Spanish Candy spoons have been working very well.

Saving the best for last, however, the king mackerel fishing is the best that Captain J can ever remember.  Trolling cigar minnows behind a jighead in 40-60 feet of water has been phenomenal.

A good day with Captain J
A good day with Captain J

April 9

Inshore water temperatures at the Murrells Inlet jetties are 62-63 degrees, and the water is still very clear.

As water temperatures have risen into the 60s Captain J Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that inshore and nearshore fishing is coming alive on the south end of the Grand Strand.

Good-sized flounderare starting to show up, and Captain J caught a nice fish off a wreck earlier this week and then several keepers inshore within a couple of days.

Black drumare also starting to show up in better numbers, and they are getting more predictable both inside the creeks and at the tip of the jetties.  Remember that black drum always like current.  You can still get away with using cut shrimp because the pinfish have not yet gotten too bad, but they are also catching them on fiddler crabs while fishing at the jetties for sheepshead.

The sheepshead bite is probably the most exciting thing going, and at both the Murrells Inlet jetties and at the Georgetown jetties they are stacked up.  For some reason the Georgetown jetties seem to have more large 6-8 pound fish, while Murrells Inlet mainly has just solid keepers.  It unclear whether the sheepshead will go offshore to spawn or do it at the jetties, but J points out that they have some really well-developed eggs.  Fiddler crabs, available at the store, are working well for bait, and chumming with barnacles improves the bite.

The troutbite may finally be slowing down the for the season, and as it gets warmer the big spotted sea trout spread out more and get harder to catch.  However, for now they can still be caught on live shrimp inshore and at the jetties. Meanwhile the weakfish (summer trout) bite is really turning on at the reefs and vertical jigging most any iron fish-shaped jig in the 1- 1.5 ounce range is working very well.  Mud minnows fished on a Carolina rig or jighead are also working.

A good early spring catch with Captain J Baisch
A good early spring catch with Captain J Baisch

There have been a little better reports for redfishin the last week, including some really big 30-inch fish in the creeks. With Winyah Bay still getting a lot of fresh water this should be a good season for the Murrells Inlet area as that drainage usually pushes them a little up the coast.

In the surf there are starting to be a smorgasboard of small fish available, and whiting have showed up in good numbers as well as some early pompano.  There are also plenty of small bluefish around, while at the reefs there are lots of 2-pounders.  The first Spanish mackerel have also started to show up nearshore, and instead of just being a by-catch while jigging for weakfish they are on the verge of becoming a targeted species.  J predicts that we are also only a week or two away from the first cobia, which could come early this year after a mild winter like some other species have.

Offshore, Georgetown Landing Marina (843-546-1776) reports that wahoo, blackfin tuna and dolphin have been caught.  There has also been some good bottom fishing.

March 22

Inshore water temperatures at the Murrells Inlet jetties are about 58 degrees, and the water is still clear even though the stringy grass is starting to break up a bit and wind this week has stirred the water up some.

Water temperatures never dipped below 52 degrees this winter along the south end of the Grand Strand, and as a result Captain J Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that fishing this early spring is nothing short of phenomenal for a couple of species.  First, the troutbite never slowed down this winter and they have caught lots of 5-7 pound fish, as well as tons of smaller ones, in the past week.  Fish can be found at the jetties as well as inside the creeks, where they will be anywhere that has current and an oyster shell bottom.  A lot of creek fish have come in the 4-foot range.

Fish can be caught across the tide cycle, but the key to catching the big fish has been floating live shrimp under a bobber.  The smaller ones will eat lures and grubs but the big fish are picky.  Baisch Boys has live shrimp in stock even though you can’t catch them in the area right now.

Generally fish are grouped by size, and so if you get into small fish you can either enjoy that size or move to find bigger ones.

J and Kelly Baisch with one of many "gators" caught this week
J and Kelly Baisch with one of many “gators” caught this week

The sheepshead bite is also outstanding right now, and because water temperatures never got cold the fish are actually all over the Murrells Inlet jetties spawning – instead of making their typical run offshore. They can be caught all over the jetties, from the inside to the outside and the tips to closer in, with the low incoming tide being the best time to fish.  Chumming with clam chum available at the store or scraping barnacles off the rocks is a good way to increase catches.  Fiddler crabs have been the best bait, and there is so much competition right now that fish are aggressive and you can fish them under a bobber.

It’s too early in the season to catch many keeper flounder, but you can catch all the small male fish you want.  It appears they never migrated offshore, while most of the better females have not returned yet.

While they are picking up the occasional fish, overall the redfish and black drum bite has been slow inshore.  However, out at the reefs there are tons of black drum, black sea bass, and some weakfish.  There are also some sheepshead spawning out about three miles at reefs and structure.

February 21

After a warm spell the weather has gotten less pleasant again, and Captain J Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that fishing activity has been relatively light.

However, there are still a few big troutbeing caught at the tips of the jetties, as well as decent numbers of 14-15 inch fish inside Murrells Inlet.   Inside the inlet Captain J continues to look for a few things in finding the best spots, including current; laid-down shell or live shell bottom; and areas with sandy, 2-foot ripples where the trout can sit and have bait washed over their heads. A good depth range remains 4-10 feet, and trout can still be caught across the tide cycle.  Both live shrimp and grubs are working.

While catches have declined there are still some black drum being caught in the same areas as the trout, particularly around shell, with the more current the better for drum.  With pinfish gone Captain J is still fishing for them the same way one would fish for catfish, putting out a number of rods with cut shrimp on the bottom and waiting.  He is also doing some very light chumming up current with small pieces of shrimp.

Catches of redfishhave really slowed down in Murrells Inlet, although around Georgetown in North Inlet as well as at the mouths of the old rice fields there have been some strong catches.

Some black drum have moved into the surf but overall surf fishing is pretty slow.

Nearshore at the 3-mile Reef Captain J has been surprised not to find sheepshead, and he can only speculate that water temperatures may have them a little further offshore to spawn.

January 24

Inshore water temperatures have dropped a couple of degrees to about 49 in the Murrells Inlet area, and the water remains very clear.

There have been some unpleasant fishing conditions recently, but Captain J Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that if anything the bite for big trout has gotten even better.  In the last week there have been some monster 25-inch fish caught.

While some fish can still be caught out at the tips of the jetties, the most and biggest fish have been caught inside Murrells Inlet either casting or trolling Mirrolures (“808” color: black back, gold side, orange belly) or grubs.

Inside the inlet Captain J continues to look for a few things in finding the best spots, including current (the bigger fish don’t mind fast-moving water); laid-down shell or live shell bottom; and areas with sandy, 2-foot ripples where the trout can sit and have bait washed over their heads.  A good depth range remains 4-10 feet, and trout can still be caught across the tide cycle.

Catches of black drum remains excellent in the same areas as the trout, with the more current the better for drum.  With pinfish gone Captain J is still fishing for them the same way one would fish for catfish, putting out a number of rods with cut shrimp on the bottom and waiting.  He is also doing some very light chumming up current with small pieces of shrimp. When the black drum take the bait it has generally been a very soft bite recently, while when redfishare picked up on the same technique it is generally a more aggressive strike.

Overall reds have been found a bit shallower than black drum, and in general Captain J is still finding them in the warmest water way up the canals.  The best time to target them is on the outgoing low tide when the water has the most potential to heat up and fish are the most active – on the incoming cold water often slows down the bite.  The best bite is when the water is out of the grass.

Even though redfish will eat cut mullet, Captain J is also targeting them with cut shrimp so that he does not cut out potential black drum (which are less likely to eat fish).

Some black drum have moved into the surf but overall surf fishing is pretty slow.

Nearshore at the 3-mile reef black drum and sheepshead can both be caught on fiddler crabs.  For right now the sheepshead are mainly smaller males, but the bigger females should be showing up any day.  From 10-20 miles offshore you can get your limit of good black sea bass.

January 17

Inshore water temperatures are just above 50 degrees in the Murrells Inlet area, and the water remains very clear.

Even though temperatures are dropping the trout have not left, and Captain J Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that they can still be caught out at the tips of the jetties as well as inside the inlet.  Because they are just coming off a shrimp bite those are still their first choice, and the store has been able to keep live shrimp in stock.  Floating live shrimp under a cork has been phenomenal for trout inside the inlet as well as at the tips of the jetties.  Mirrolures, grubs, and Trout Tricks will also work.

Inside the inlet Captain J continues to look for a few things in finding the best spots, including current (the bigger fish don’t mind fast-moving water); laid-down shell or live shell bottom; and areas with sandy, 2-foot ripples where the trout can sit and have bait washed over their heads.  A good depth range remains 4-10 feet, and trout can be caught across the tide cycle right now.

Catches of black drum remains excellent in the same areas as the trout, with the more current the better for drum.  With pinfish gone Captain J is still fishing for them the same way one would fish for catfish, putting out a number of rods with cut shrimp on the bottom and waiting.  He is also doing some very light chumming up current with small pieces of shrimp. When the black drum take the bait it has generally been a very soft bite recently, while when redfishare picked up on the same technique it is generally a more aggressive strike.

Overall reds have been found a bit shallower than black drum, and in general Captain J is still finding them in the warmest water way up the canals.  The best time to target them is on the outgoing low tide when the water has the most potential to heat up and fish are the most active – on the incoming cold water often slows down the bite.  The best bite is when the water is out of the grass.

Even though redfish will eat cut mullet, Captain J is also targeting them with cut shrimp so that he does not cut out potential black drum (which are less likely to eat fish).

A smorgasbord of inshore fish caught recently with Captain J Baisch
A smorgasbord of inshore fish caught recently with Captain J Baisch

Some black drum have moved into the surf but overall surf fishing is pretty slow.

Nearshore at the 3-mile reef black drum and sheepshead can both be caught on fiddler crabs.   If anglers go 10 miles offshore and reach 50 or 60 feet there are good black sea bass available.

January 11

Inshore water is cold and very clear on the south end of the Grand Strand.

The fishing has been excellent around Murrells Inlet, and Captain J Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that they continue to catch a ton of fish.

Trout are in a transition period, but fortunately for fishermen it’s a good transition.  They can still be caught out at the tips of the jetties, but as shrimp start to disappear from the surf a lot of the big 17-22+ inch fish are moving inside the inlet chasing new food sources (chiefly fish).  But they are just coming off a shrimp bite, and so if they can get it that is still their first choice.  The store has been able to keep live shrimp in stock, and floating live shrimp under a cork has been phenomenal for trout inside the inlet as well as at the tips of the jetties.  Mirrolures, grubs, and Trout Tricks will also work.

Inside the inlet J. looks for a few things in finding the best spots, including current (the bigger fish don’t mind fast-moving water); laid-down shell or live shell bottom; and areas with sandy, 2-foot ripples where the trout can sit and have bait washed over their heads.  A good depth range is 4-10 feet, and trout can be caught across the tide cycle right now.

A nice jetty trout caught this week with Captain J Baisch
A nice jetty trout caught this week with Captain J Baisch

Catches of black drum have also been excellent.  Black drum are frequently an indicator species for trout, and they are often found in the same areas.  With pinfish gone Captain J is fishing for them the same way one would fish for catfish, putting out a number of rods with cut shrimp on the bottom and waiting.  He is also doing some very light chumming up current with small pieces of shrimp.  When the black drum take the bait it has generally been a very soft bite recently, while when redfishare picked up on the same technique it is generally a more aggressive strike.

Overall reds have been found a bit shallower than black drum, and in general Captain J is finding them in the warmest water way up the canals.  The best time to target them is on the outgoing low tide when the water has the most potential to heat up and fish are the most active – on the incoming cold water often slows down the bite.  The best bite is when the water is out of the grass.

Amazingly, they are still catching keeper-sized flounder floating shrimp in Murrells Inlet.  In the Pawley’s Island area fishermen are still buying mud minnows to drift, although this cold snap may signal the end of the flounder season.

Some black drum have moved into the surf but overall surf fishing is pretty slow.

Nearshore at the 3-mile reef black drum and sheepshead can both be caught on fiddler crabs.   If anglers go 10 miles offshore and reach 50 or 60 feet there are good black sea bass available.

December 19

Inshore water temperatures have dropped into the lower 50s along the south end of the Grand Strand.  The water is generally clear.

Winter is approaching but there are still a smorgasbord of species biting around Murrells Inlet.  Captain J Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that they are catching a bunch of trout, black drum and sheepshead, and some redfish are also being picked up.

A lot of anglers are catching trout trolling Mirrolures and grubs inside the creeks and inlet, but the biggest fish have been caught out at the jetties.  Shrimp are making their way down the coast, and when they hit the jetties they get pushed out to the ends where the big trout are waiting.  In the last week Captain J has caught a couple of fish over 5 to go with multiple 3- and 4-pound fish.  Live shrimp are available in the store.

Both in the creeks and out at the jetties cut shrimp on the bottom are working well for black drum. Even though it’s cold fish are still in some of the same 3-4 foot deep spots where they can be found in the summer, but they are biting differently.  Instead of a hard pull it’s more a like a pinfish bite that bounces a bit.  With the water very clear a stealthy approach is necessary and you need to drift quietly in instead of motoring up and banging around.  Then set up multiple rods as if you are catfish fishing.

Captain J Baisch with a pair of nice black drum
Captain J Baisch with a pair of nice black drum

Sheepshead fishing continues to be really good around the Murrells Inlet jetties.  They are catching fish over rocks on the incoming tide and at the tip of the jetties at low tide.  Both barnacles and fiddler crabs are working.

Some reds continue to be caught mixed in with the black drum on shrimp, and there are also redfish taking finger mullet.  Even very late in the season finger mullet can still be found in the creeks.

November 27

Inshore water temperatures have dropped into the upper 50s along the south end of the Grand Strand.  Tides have been extreme and the water is dirty.

There are still a ton of small trout around in the Murrells Inlet area, but Captain J. Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that they are starting to see more big ones.  Out at the jetties there are a lot of good trout, and there are also some better fish in the creeks.

Trout will still eat live shrimp, available at the store, fished under a float.  However, cleaning fish Captain J has started to notice that the bigger fish generally have baitfish in their stomachs, and he has had success for better fish switching over to Mirrolures and paddle tail grubs.  But good fish can certainly be caught on shrimp, too.

Fish can still be found anywhere where there is a little current from 3-10 feet, and 7-9 feet remains a good range.

In the last two weeks the black drumbite has really turned on, and Captain J has been catching fish around jetties, oysters bars, or anywhere that current runs over a shell bottom.  He is basically fishing for them the same way you would anchor for catfish, casting out a bunch of rods with fresh, cut shrimp and waiting for the fish to find the bait.  There are still some pinfish and croaker around, but you don’t have to worry as much about bait stealers as a month ago.

Some nice black drum caught with Captain J
Some nice black drum caught with Captain J

They are also picking up some redfish on cut shrimp while fishing for black drum.

Sheepsheadfishing continues to be really good around the Murrells Inlet jetties and the Georgetown jetties.  They are catching fish over rocks on the incoming tide and at the tip of the jetties at low tide.  Both barnacles and fiddler crabs are working.

Interestingly there are still some big flounder around, and giggers report seeing some 7- and 8-pound fish.  While netting shrimp Captain J has also seen some good ones.

Black drum and whiting can still be found in the surf.

November 12

Inshore water temperatures have dropped into the mid-60s along the south end of the Grand Strand.

It would not have seemed possible nine, six, or even two or three months ago, but Captain J. Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that he is seeing more trout in Murrells Inlet right now than he has ever seen before.  In the last three days his boat has caught more than 150 trout, with the only downside being that nine out of ten are sub-legal fish. After the super cold winter that slowed down the trout fishing earlier this year it only makes sense that these fish have come from somewhere else, perhaps displaced from North Carolina as a result of the storms and freshwater inflow.

Trout will eat live shrimp, still available at the store, fished under a float.  Zman Trout Tricks and Zman MinnowZ in opening night color have also been working well.  Fish are eating glass minnows, which go all over the place, as well as shrimp, and so they can be found anywhere where there is a little current from 3-10 feet. 7-9 feet has been a good range.

Mrs. Baisch with a nice one caught on Captain J's boat
Mrs. Baisch with a nice one caught on Captain J’s boat

The bite for slot-sized redfish has been good in all the usual places around oyster beds with live mullet.  Fishing for bull reds has slowed down.

Sheepsheadfishing has been really good, and both around the Murrells Inlet jetties and around the Georgetown jetties they have been killing the convict fish.  Fiddler crabs are working both places, with the best fishing in Georgetown around low tide but Murrells Inlet fish biting on different parts of the jetties throughout the tide cycle.

Even though it’s getting late in the year flounder fishing is still good, and at low tide you can still catch a good number of fish.  While some smaller fish will winter here in the next month most flounder will leave.

Black drum fishing has been slow.

Whiting, bluefish and the end of the year’s pompanohave been caught in the surf.

October 19

Inshore water temperatures are still unseasonably warm in the mid- to upper-70s along the Grand Strand, and the water is very stained.

October is usually a peak time to fish the South Grand Strand, and Captain J. Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that this month is no exception.  Despite the dirty water, and spotty catches of shrimp for bait, they are still catching tons of fish.

Inshore smaller “rat” redfish are really thick, and with so much rainwater coming up from Georgetown Captain J wonders if those fish have pushed up to Pawley’s and Murrells Inlet.

The flounder fishing has also been really good, and right now fish can be caught anywhere along the beach where there is some structure to create an ambush point for the fish, such as the groins at Garden City. The mullet run is underway, and mullet generally swim near the surface.  Flounder don’t want to come more than about three feet off the bottom to attack a bait, and so you need to fish fairly shallow.

There has also been some good troutaction floating live shrimp at the jetties.

In the surf pompano fishing has been excellent.  There are not a lot of sand fleas around right now, but salted clam available at the store has been working well.

The most exciting bite going, however, has been for king mackerel.  There are schools of big kings in the 20-40 pound range right off the beach, and trolling off Garden City and Surfside has led to some excellent catches.  Tarpon have been mixed in and it has been some really fun fishing.

A nice king caught off the beach with Captain J. Baisch
A nice king caught off the beach with Captain J. Baisch

Bull red drum in the 20-40 pound range can be caught around rock piles on cut bait.

September 21

The mullet run is in full swing along the South Grand Strand, and Captain J. Baisch of Fishful Thinking Guide Service (843-902-0356) and Baisch Boys Bait and Tackle (843-651-1915) reports that this means that the fishing is outstanding.

In the surf red drum are hanging out at most any ambush point waiting for mullet to swim by, and the fish are so thick that they are biting around the tide cycle.  Groins, jetties or any other current break off Garden City, Litchfield, Pawley’s or at the main Murrells Inlet jetties are holding reds.  At the tips of the big jetties there are big drum, and further in plenty of slot-sized fish.  Black drum are also in the same areas feeding on shrimp.

In the creeks there is also good fishing for redfish, but on the higher tides the bait goes up in the grass to hide so they can be harder to target.  On low tide the fishing is wide open.

It's redfish time!
It’s redfish time!

There is also an excellent bite for Spanish mackerel and bluefish along the beach on mullet and artificial lures, and the Spanish are close enough in that with the right tackle you can cast to them right off the beach.

Flounderare relatively few and far between, and it seems like the freshwater inflow has pushed them further out.

Offshore, Georgetown Landing Marina (843-546-1776) reports that wahooblacken tuna and dolphin have been caught.

Search